Meeps’ Display of Vintage Photos Makes a Statement

During Adams Morgan Day on Sunday, Meeps showed off the latest collection of vintage items in its store window. However, these items aren’t for sale. In fact, they aren’t even clothes. Where store owner Cathy Chung normally showcases her latest vintage blouses and pants stands a blue, living room wall covered with vintage photos of…

In Shoulder the Deed, Artists Reflect on the Present and the Past

In the exhibition Shoulder the Deed at Eckington gallery STABLE, the curators have gone back and fetched a history that strengthens the establishment not only of STABLE, but also of the Black artists living and working in D.C.

Originating from the Akan people of Ghana, the term Sankofa is often associated with the proverb “Se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi,” meaning “it is not taboo to go back and fetch what you forgot.” The Adinkra symbol for the concept is a mythical bird flying forward with its head turned backward. In…

Food for the People Spotlights Those Working for a More Equitable Food System

The Anacostia Community Museum’s new outdoor exhibition highlights 12 local changemakers who work on nutrition, health, and food justice.

“One out of 10 residents of the metropolitan Washington region is food insecure, and nearly a third of them are children,” according to the Capital Area Food Bank. Food insecurity is a longstanding problem, made even more visible during the COVID-19 pandemic, as individuals and organizations put in work to supplement a food system that…

Raya Bodnarchuk Painted Every Day for Years. All 1,926 Paintings Are Now on Display.

The American University Museum exhibition This Is a True Picture of How it Was displays nearly six years’ worth of life-affirming daily paintings.

Raya Bodnarchuk didn’t plan her joyous, life-affirming series of 1,926 daily paintings as a formal project. For close to six years, she just decided to do something every day that she likes to do, no matter what else was happening. Something tiny, but really good.  “Life gets complicated,” she says. “We all take out the…

We Miss You Is a Site-Specific Look at One Artist’s Pandemic Year

Kaitlin Jencso used her camera to mark time during the lost year; her collection of more than 1,000 images is painstakingly mounted at Hamiltonian Artists.

Like the rest of us, Kaitlin Jencso endured the coronavirus pandemic. As a photographer, she decided to mark time during the lost year through her photographs, turning them into something like tally marks scrawled on a wall to count the days as they pass. The result is We Miss You, a site-specific collection of more…

What D.C. Museums Are Open and When?

Here’s a lightly curated roundup

The pandemic isn’t yet over, but D.C. is unquestionably reopening. On May 21, Mayor Muriel Bowser lifted capacity restrictions at most venues, including restaurants, schools, offices, and retail. (Tell us how your outings to your favorite bars went by responding to this email and we’ll include as many responses as we can in a future edition of…

Catherine Anchin, New Director at Arlington Arts Center, Chats About The Past and Future

This week, the Arlington Arts Center welcomes Catherine Anchin as the center’s executive director. Anchin succeeds Holly Koons, who left the center in October of 2020 to become director of the new Christopher Newport University Fine Arts Center in Newport News, Virginia. For the past nine years, Anchin has worked at the Smithsonian’s National Museum…

Authenticity and Identity Explores Jewish Artwork in a Thorough Online Exhibition

Curated by Georgetown professor Ori Z. Soltes, the exhibition reflects on culture, spirituality, and heritage.

I’ll admit that it took me several chunks of time, distributed across three days, to make my way through the online version of Authenticity and Identity, an exhibition on Jewish artwork curated by Georgetown University professor Ori Z. Soltes. My slow pace wasn’t because the exhibition was boring—in fact, its variety and depth was immersive…

The Smithsonian Craft Show Goes Green in “Craft Optimism”

This year’s Smithsonian Craft Show, opening two days after Earth Day, has a special focus: sustainability.

For nearly 40 years, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee has drawn artists from all over the country to showcase and sell their work at the prestigious Smithsonian Craft Show. Last March, when COVID-19 forced many facets of our lives online, the Smithsonian Craft Show was one of few craft fairs that successfully made the transition. More…

Sonya Clark: Tatter, Bristle, and Mend Uses Hair to Tell the Story of Black Life

Clark alerts us to the politicization of Black hair by featuring it in a way that connects it to experiences, particularly the transatlantic slave trade, that have inhibited African diasporic peoples’ progression.

Sonya Clark: Tatter, Bristle, and Mend Digital exhibition at nmwa.org to June 27 On one level, some of Sonya Clark’s art is unassuming—a ball of hair might not be seen as extremely political. But once placed in an exhibition with an unraveling Confederate battle flag, reconsidering the narrative of a ball of hair is necessary.…

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.