City Paper’s Best Stories of 2021, As Selected By Its Staff

Presenting Washington City Paper’s best stories of 2021, as selected by its highly objective, in no way biased staff.

Of the roughly 1,100 stories Washington City Paper published in 2021, some were bound to rise to the top. Earlier this week, we presented the 15 stories readers clicked on most this year. Now we’re getting subjective and sharing the stories that resonated with us over the past 12 months. The pieces below, selected by…

Will STAY DC Program Be Enough to Stop Expected Surge in Evictions?

Advocates fear those who had trouble applying and receiving funds through the flawed program will be evicted in the new year.

Antonio, a D.C. busboy, had no work after the pandemic forced some restaurants to lay off employees. For nearly a year, Antonio’s household of four had no income; his wife, Irma, 54, has been on dialysis for five years. The family had to scrounge up whatever money they could while accumulating more than a year…

Give It Up, D.C. 2021

Our annual guide to giving back, presented in partnership with the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington

Nonprofit organizations are an industry unto themselves in D.C., providing careers for many and directing services to thousands of individuals across the region. Big-budget nonprofits may get a bigger share of the glory (and the donations), but City Paper’s attention often drifts toward smaller organizations doing direct outreach. Perhaps it’s because we share similar underdog…

Local Scientists Are Researching How Microplastics Are Impacting the Potomac and Anacostia Watersheds

Even though microplastics have been found in waterways and other ecosystems around the country, they’re an understudied topic and it’s currently unclear just how many have accumulated in the Anacostia and Potomac rivers.

It was a gloomy Tuesday at National Harbor, with enough rainfall to soak your socks and render your eyeglasses useless. Save for a few rollicking ducks, few bothered to venture to the water’s edge on such a dreary day. Except for Jesse Meiller and J. Adam Frederick, that is. They crouched over a dock at the…

Weekend Roundup: Another Pedestrian Killed While Crossing the Street

Plus Trump hotel sale, Howard dorm floods, and Dave Thomas Circle redesign

Another pedestrian was killed while crossing a D.C. street. Nina Larson was struck by a driver as she crossed Columbia Road NW in Adams Morgan Saturday. D.C. police say Larson was transported to a local hospital where she died of her injuries. Larson’s mother, Matilde Larson, told the Washington Post that she “brought beauty to…

AlleyHop Series Invites Residents to Reimagine D.C.’s Alleys

Washington Alley Project pushes residents to see spaces differently with new viewfinders.

If an alley near your home could become anything you wanted, would you picture urban agriculture, mixed-use residential space, or a multi-use area? This was the question of the afternoon for attendees at the Washington Alley Project AlleyHop tour in Columbia Heights yesterday. The tours are part of an initiative to steep residents in the history…

Metro By the Numbers

A numerical look at what’s right and oh so wrong with WMATA.

The platform of the Columbia Heights Metro Station is packed during an evening rush hour in late October. The benches are so crowded people are sitting on the stairs. Many have removed their masks and don’t maintain appropriate social distance. When the arrivals board for Yellow Line trains switches from a number of minutes to…

Mendelson Notches Embarrassing Loss on Arts Commission Nominations

Medical marijuana, the McMillan development, and safe harbor for tenants dominated D.C. Council legislative meeting.

No surprise, medical marijuana was a hot topic at the D.C. Council legislative meeting yesterday. The Council unanimously approved a measure that extends the expiration date of medical marijuana cards from one year to two, doubles the legal amount someone can carry, and eases ID requirements. At-Large Councilmember Elissa Silverman and Ward 2 Councilmember Brooke…

Former DOES Employee Sues Agency For Hundreds of Hours of Unpaid Overtime

“This is definitely one of the most ironic cases I’ve had to file over the last decade.”

A former employee of the Department of Employment Services is suing the agency alleging he’s owed tens of thousands of dollars in overtime pay for the extra time he spent on the clock during the pandemic. DOES is the very agency that maintains an Office of Wage-Hour Compliance tasked with recovering unpaid wages for employees…

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