Credit: Darrow Montgomery/File

We know D.C. Get our free newsletter to stay in the know.

Talk about a Friday news dump: Before the holiday weekend could even begin, the federal department of Housing and Urban Development dropped a 72-page audit of the D.C. Housing Authority that “reads like a top-to-bottom indictment of the entire agency from executive leadership to the board of commissioners to the employees, many of whom, the audit found, are not properly trained to do their jobs,” Mitch Ryals writes.

The audit found that just 76.4 percent of DCHA’s public housing was occupied as of June and leaders could not identify which units were vacant. That’s particularly troubling because the waiting list for public housing in D.C. is more than 40,000 people long and has been closed to new applicants since April 2013. 

Reporting on the audit has also reinvigorated the at-large Council race. Democratic nominee Anita Bonds, who chairs the Council’s housing committee, told the Post she expects DCHA to “grow from this.” At-Large Councilmember Elissa Silverman, who is running against Bonds in the general election, released a statement in which she vowed to introduce legislation that will reform the agency. It needs, she says, “a complete leadership overhaul.”

Credit: Darrow Montgomery/file

D.C. Housing Authority Is Failing in Just About Every Way

It took all of five days for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development […]

The rest of the weekend proved similarly eventful, particularly if you planned to drive on the inner loop of the Beltway.

Climate Emergency on Colesville

Climate advocates attempting to pressure President Biden to declare a federal climate emergency closed all lanes of the Beltway’s inner loop at the Colesville Road interchange in Silver Spring Monday morning. The blockade lasted for roughly an hour, from 10:30 to around 11:20 a.m., and seven people were subsequently arrested.

Protestors also shut down a portion of Interstate 395 near 7th Street NW on Friday morning, and another individual climbed on stage at the Kennedy Center during a performance on Thursday evening with a banner that said “DECLARE EMERGENCY.”

Shootings Continue in Southeast, Northwest

Six teenagers were shot and wounded in less than 24 hours throughout Sunday and Monday. One individual was shot on Birney Place SE following a verbal altercation and another was shot on Independence Avenue SE when two people fired at him from a car. Two more people were shot on Stanton Road SE on Sunday afternoon. On Monday, a young man was shot near the Park View Recreation Center and another person was shot at 14th Street and Columbia Road NW. No arrests have been made in any of the altercations. 

Three adult men were also shot near the intersection of 7th and O streets NW on Sunday and were taken to area hospitals in serious condition.

Caroline Jones (tips? cjones@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • To see today’s COVID-19 data, visit our coronavirus tracker.
  • Real estate developer Brian Bailey and former FBI agent David Paitsel were found guilty in a bribery scheme that allowed Bailey to exploit D.C.’s TOPA law. [Bisnow]
  • NBC4’s Pat Collins made a cameo on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver for his theatrical coverage of a jilted lover’s misplaced anger. [YouTube]
  • Finally, a new urgent care facility opened in Ward 8. [Axios]
  • Prosecutors dropped the charges against Adnan Syed, who was released from prison last month after his conviction was overturned. The move preempts an appeal from the family of Hae Min Lee, the ex-girlfriend Syed was convicted of killing. He served more than 20 years in prison, and has maintained his innocence. Syed’s case gained national attention when it was featured on the popular podcast Serial. [Baltimore Banner]

By City Paper staff (tips? editor@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Evictions in D.C. are ticking up, but still far below their pre-COVID levels. Activists credit the city’s coterie of relief programs for that change, though they caution that the rollback of some renter protections earlier this month could shift those numbers. [DCist]
  • D.C. Public Schools officials will start enforcing a vaccine mandate today for all kids in pre-K through fifth grade. The mandate covers routine shots for things like measles, polio, and whooping cough, and will eventually be extended to older students next month. [Post]
  • Of D.C.’s 345 advisory neighborhood commissioner districts, 57 don’t have any candidates on the ballot (including 24 in wards 7 and 8). There’s still time for write-in candidates to get organized to ensure that the roughly 114,000 residents represented by those ANCs won’t lack hyperlocal representation. [EOTR News]

By Alex Koma (tips? akoma@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Smokey burgers, roasted oysters, muffaletta sandwiches, and all-you-can-eat dim sum are just some of the menu items that these 11 new restaurants are serving up. [Washingtonian]
  • Casey Patten, Gerald Addison, and Chris Morgan estimate that they ate more than 60 varieties of fried chicken across the south. It was all in preparation for the opening of their new downtown restaurant, Little Chicken. [Post]
  • Opal, a new American spot from the owners of Nina May, brings fancy cocktails and “earthy dishes” to Chevy Chase. [Eater]

By City Paper staff (tips? editor@washingtoncitypaper.com)

Credit: Patrick Gallagher Landes

Einstein’s Wife Acknowledges that Mileva Marić Was There, Besides Albert

ExPats Theatre staged Serbian playwright Snežana Gnjidić‘s Einstein’s Wife in 2020, but the run was […]

  • Embracing Arlington Arts is attempting to bring a 14,300-square-foot performing arts space—complete with black box theater, rehearsal studios, dressing rooms, and more—to Arlington. Amazon has already offered financial support. [ARLnow]
  • Middleburg Film Festival celebrates its 10th annual edition this weekend with 40 films—its largest program ever, which includes Noah Baumbach’s opening-night film, White Noise, starring Adam Driver. Michael Abels, who wrote the scores for Get Out, Us, and Nope, will be honored. [Post]
  • IMO, every season is book season, but check out some recommendations from local booksellers on what to read this fall. [Washingtonian]

By Sarah Marloff (tips? smarloff@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • The Wizards launched Arabic-language social media accounts, the first NBA team to do so. [DCist]
  • Travis Hawkins, head coach of Maryland’s Northwest High School football team, is facing misdemeanor assault charges in connection with an on-field brawl between his team and Gaithersburg High School players. [WJLA]
  • Congratulations to D.C. United for finishing at the bottom of the MLS this season and making the Washington Nationals feel less lonely. [Post]

By City Paper staff (tips? editor@washingtoncitypaper.com)

Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here. Send tips, ideas, and comments to newsletter@washingtoncitypaper.com.