Credit: Darrow Montgomery and Stephanie Rudig

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Pro tip: Pay the parking meter. Why? All parking enforcement returns to D.C. on Tuesday, June 1. 

For over a year, residents and visitors have mostly dodged tickets. But come Tuesday, D.C.’s 240 parking officers will again enforce expired parking meters, along with expired residential parking permits and vehicle tags; no parking zones; registration of residential out-of-state automobiles; and abandoned vehicles. Street sweeping also returns, meaning cars parked in street sweeping zones during posted sweeping hours will be ticketed. 

Coinciding with the return of parking enforcement is the start of a new amnesty program for drivers with outstanding tickets. The program waives late fees on tickets during an amnesty period, which lasts between June 1 and Sept. 30. Drivers still need to pay the original ticket amount, but penalties will be waived for tickets issued before Sept. 30 during the four-month window. Come Oct. 1, all penalties will be added back on all tickets. Tickets related to parking, photo enforcement (like speed and red-light and stop-sign cameras), and minor moving violations are eligible for the amnesty program. For more information, click HERE

“We know we can expect to see more activity on our roads and sidewalks, and these enforcement mechanisms are one way we can make our transportation network more efficient, restart important government services, and help protect residents and visitors as they move around DC,” said Mayor Muriel Bowser in a statement when she announced the amnesty program. “We encourage all residents with outstanding tickets to learn more about the ticket amnesty program and get current on any outstanding fines.”

One of the D.C.’s most consistent cash flows comes from traffic enforcement. The D.C. government has lost roughly $72 million in fines related to parking restrictions and residential, school, and commercial zones since March 2020, according to the Post

Residential parking increases and DC DMV requirements return on Tuesday as well. Households with multiple vehicles will pay more for parking on residential streets. The annual fee for a one-year Residential Parking Permit sticker for the first registered vehicle will increase from $35 to $50, and additional fees will apply to any more vehicles of that same household. It’ll cost $75 for the second vehicle, $100 for the third, and $150 for each vehicle beyond the first three. The DC DMV makes an exemption for one resident 65 years or older per household. 

The DMV is again requiring all D.C.-registered vehicles to display valid registration and inspection stickers to avoid any penalties. If anything is expired, individuals have to renew online or by mail. Individuals have to renew online or by mail. The DMV also says any tickets issued after June 1 will be subject to adjudication hearing timelines listed on the back of the tickets. Tickets issued between Jan 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021 are still eligible for adjudication and payment of any fines until Sept. 30.

What comes back July 1: Parking officers will boot vehicles with two or more outstanding tickets that are over 60 days old; and the DMV will require all expired driver licenses and ID cards to be renewed before July 1, 2021 (Residents with a REAL ID credential, or black star in right corner, should renew online whereas residents without a REAL ID credential and residents 70 years or older should renew in person at the DMV). 

At-Large Christina Henderson periodically flags when the DMV has appointments available on Twitter, so follow her for updates.

—Amanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • There is only one coronavirus metric in the red, at Phase 0/1 levels: Positive case interviews completed by contact tracers. To see today’s coronavirus cases and more information, visit our coronavirus dashboard. [EOM]
  • A lawyer for the Metropolitan Police Department admits to using tear gas on Lafayette Park protesters in June 2020. [WUSA9]
  • A protected bike lane in Shaw is coming to fruition, finally. [DCist]

By Amanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com)

Mitch Ryals is away from his desk. Loose Lips Links will return on June 8.

By Mitch Ryals (tips? mryals@washingtoncitypaper.com)

Credit: Julep PR

As D.C. Fully Reopens, What Does the Future Hold for Streateries?

The streatery at Lulu’s Wine Garden is suitable for all weather. On a sunny day, […]

  • The president and vice president dined at Le Diplomate on Memorial Day. [Washingtonian]
  • Taco Bell Cantina opens in Columbia Heights. [DCist]
  • Six new D.C. area restaurants you should know about. [Thrillist]
  • The messy history of hamburgers. [Post]

By Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Strathmore and the Boulanger Initiative present the WoCo Fest from June 3 to 6. [Post]
  • IATSE Local 868 held a protest outside The Music Center at Strathmore on Sunday; the group says proposed automated ticket kiosks will take the jobs of ticket sellers. [WTOP, Bethesda Beat]
  • The Trust for Public Land ranks D.C.’s park system as best in the nation. [Washingtonian]

By Emma Sarappo (tips? esarappo@washingtoncitypaper.com)

Credit: Kelyn Soong

Wizards Stay Alive With Game 4 Win Over the 76ers

Bradley Beal had never been in this position before. In seven previous playoff series Beal […]

  • The Washington Spirit picked up its second win in under a week with a 1-0 victory over OL Reign. [Black & Red United]
  • The Nats have lost five straight games and are currently in last place in the NL East. [AP]

By Kelyn Soong (tips? ksoong@washingtoncitypaper.com)