In the emergency room at Montgomery General Hospital in Olney, there is a cabinet with drawers variously labeled “CRICOTHYRODOMY TRAY,” “TRACH TUBES,” and the like. The bottom drawer carries the sign “OVASSAPIAN AIRWAYS,” to which some wag has affixed a label reading, “THE ONLY WAY TO FLY.”

An appropriate joke, because hospitals are much like airports: both locations demand that you wait for freakin’ ever.

And, as of course you know, an ovassapian airway is “intended primarily for use in intubations utilizing a fiberoptic endoscope,” as it is designed “for removal without disconnecting or displacing positioned endotracheal tube.”