The surge, sort of, continues for stock in Dan Snyder’s theme park chain. Six Flags (SIX) climbed above the Mendoza Line on Monday, closing at $2.01 a share.

That’s nothing close to the $11.80 that the stock traded at around the time Snyder took over the company. But, less than two weeks ago, the same stock traded for just $1.46, a historic low and a level that might have adversely affected workplace morale around Redskins Park.

The recent uptick comes amid scads of bad news for Six Flags. The worst: Last week, Kaitlyn Lasitter, the 14-year-old whose feet were chopped off at Kentucky Kingdom last year — an incident that the company blamed (along with the weather in Texas) for its overall horrible performance in the summer of 2007 — started talking publicly for the first time since the tragedy.

The stories about what Lassiter endured are scarier than any rollercoaster ride.

Here, from the Indianapolis Star:

Kaitlyn Lasitter said the Superman Tower of Power ride had climbed only 20 feet last summer when it jolted and cables fell on her and two of her friends, wrapping around their necks, according to court documents.

Kaitlyn said she and her friends, as well as other people on the ride, were screaming for someone to stop the ride, but it kept going up as the girls frantically pulled the cables away from their necks.

“We were all screaming, and then it kept going up, and we just continually screamed and were yelling at people,” Kaitlyn said in her deposition. “I remember smoke and the smell of burning. I felt like I was going to die.”

When the ride reached its peak, Kaitlyn said she told the friend next to her — a girl with whom she’d just traded seats — that she loved her. She remembers something hard hitting her in the head before the ride plunged.

Then, she said, she felt “yanked” from her seat before being restrained by her safety belt.

“I remember feeling like I was on fire and smelling burning flesh,” she said.

Oh, my.

Keep the dial right here for all the breaking news in Snyder’s Six Flags soap opera.