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Yet another reason why more Americans should stay home on election day:

Republicans are generally convinced that Democrats are a bunch of self-destructive, naïve Commies. Democrats, conversely, assume a healthy plurality of Republicans boast the IQ of a spotted toad.

Well, the good folks at the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press recently measured the political acumen of more than 3,000 adults and found that we’re equally uninformed and both ridiculously ill-equipped to vote….

And since most of us are hopelessly dense — or, at least, that’s the rationalization we hear every time a Republican is elected — it is interesting to note that viewers of Fox News’ partisan slugfest, Hannity & Colmes, scored only 2 percent below those smarty pants who listen to NPR.

In fact, larger numbers of habitual listeners of Rush Limbaugh than erudite readers of The New Yorker and Vanity Fair were able to explain who is in charge of Congress.

Read the whole thing, courtesy of the Denver Post’s David Harsanyi (and a hat tip to Matt Welch).

Let’s face it—-most of the yuppies who pledge allegiance to Vanity Fair and NPR read only James Wolcott’s pieces and listen only to Car Talk (and/or A Prairie Home Companion). As a reader of VF (though not the New Yorker) I’m downright embarrassed that my fellow subscribers couldn’t beat Douche Limbaugh’s listeners in a very simple poll. What the fuck, people? You call yourselves the liberal elite? Get it together. Take notes. Buy a highlighter or something. Consider making flash cards.

[Side note: I wanted to work at NPR once upon a time, and an older, wiser journalist told me that the only times I wouldn’t regret working in public radio would be during cocktail parties, when I could brag about working for next to nothing in a medium that no one cares about. I now suspect that catering to listeners who know less than AM nut jobs would cancel out the cocktail effect.]