We value your support now more than ever.

All year we’ve been covering the issues that matter most to you—the pandemic, the election, policing, housing, and more—and now our end of year membership campaign is here. Will you support our work to ensure we can bring you the same informative local reporting in 2021?

As much local politics as humanly possible. Send your tips, releases, stories, events, etc. to lips@washingtoncitypaper.com. And get LL Daily sent straight to your inbox every morning.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT—-“Councilmember Barry: What Did Sharon Bowen Actually Do?

Morning all. First, local legendary singer Eddie Daye passed away late last week. Our own music bloghas posted a sweet tribute to the man and his talents. He was 78. Key graph: “While those online and crate-digging fans may cherish copies of his obscure singles (some of which have been reissued on cd), I will just keep my memories of those fun late nights out seeing him sing bluesy soul and my conversations with him about his musical career and his take on 50 plus years of r’n’b history.”

SUMMER FINALLY COMES TO D.C.: The heat is upon us; today, temps are expected to climb into the triple digits. WTOP reports that the District is opening up several cooling centers and extending hours at area pools. WJLA and NBC4 also has a story on the heat wave. AP has another story, this one one the opening up of a new aquatic center in Tenleytown.

A MUST READ FROM COLBY KING: On Saturday, Colbert King published an eye-opening column on disorderly conduct arrests by D.C. Police officers. Citing records from the Office of Police Complaints, King produces a few stunning accounts of police abusing “disorderly conduct” charges against District residents. One of the many key graphs: “Residents are arrested in D.C. for disorderly conduct in large numbers: nearly 5,000 in 2007, more than 4,200 in 2008 and 4,469 this year as of Aug. 5. Many are probably arrested for good reasons: noise violations, blocking public spaces, etc. But, as in the Gates arrest, some busts never make it to court.”

FENTY’S DRIVING RECORD: WaPo cites several sources critical of Mayor Fenty‘s insistence on driving himself to various ribbon cuttings, press conferences, etc. Nikita Stewart notes in her lengthy piece that no other big city mayor drives themselves around. Key quote: “I think it’s curious that he’s driving himself,” said D.C. Council member Phil Mendelson (D-At Large), chairman of the Committee on Public Safety and the Judiciary. “Why not have the security detail . . . when you have an accident like this past week?” Outside experts from other cities say security should be a top priority, and we’re not paying Fenty to drive around, we’re paying him to make decisions and think critically about the city’s needs—-we don’t want him spending his time worrying about getting across town.

AFTER THE JUMP: More revelations on the Metro front, Jonetta sticks up for AG Peter Nickles, and much, much more.

HAWK ONE: The ubiquitous private security firm is trying to save its District contracts, the Examiner’s Michael Neibauer reports. Expect some kind of media blitz by Hawk One managers to save their contracts. A bit of news in this story: “Ward 6 D.C. Councilman Tommy Wells, a former school board member, said he wanted to consider hiring security officers as employees of the city government, rather than as private contractors.”

METRO PROBLEMS: Here’s some quick links. WaPo continues to be all over this story. The crash system failed in June during a near crash: “The crash-avoidance system suspected of failing in the recent deadly accident on Metro’s Red Line malfunctioned three months earlier, when a rush-hour train on Capitol Hill came ‘dangerously close’ to another train and halted only after the operator hit the emergency brake, newly obtained records show.” AP follows up. Metro’s oversight panel has little sway, WaPo reports. Key graph: “The committee has no direct regulatory authority over safety and cannot order Metro to make changes. It has no employees of its own and no dedicated office, phone or Web site. It borrows space for its monthly meetings, which officials said no member of the public has ever attended.” WaPo also reports that a Metro worker died Sunday after being struck by a piece of track equipment.

Jonetta Rose Barras stands up for AG Peter Nickles. This is one of the more phoned-in columns I’ve seen in a while. Key graph: “He has aggressively defended the city against lawsuits, saving taxpayers tons of money. He has protected citizens against corporations and individuals who have attempted to rip them off or deny them their rights. His office battled CareFirst over its alleged failure to invest profits in the health care of low-income people. He jacked up slum landlords and private companies scamming black churches. He pushed for improvements in Child and Family Services and, with the council, defended the city’s gun control laws.” Nickles may or may not have pushed for improvements with CFSA—-but he has most certainly pushed to get CFSA out of its court oversight as the agency continues to fail to meet its benchmarks.

MAYOR’S SCHEDULE:

10:30 a.m. Remarks Alice Deal Middle School Ribbon Cutting Location: 3185 Fort Drive, NW

2:00 p.m. Remarks Bruce Monroe Elementary School Demolition Location: 3012 Georgia Avenue, NW

6:30 p.m. Remarks 2014 Gay Games Kickoff Rally Location: Stead Field 1625 P Street, NW