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The District’s unemployment rate had steady at 9.9 percent in August. Let’s call it 10 percent! The Department of Employment Services tries to blame the end of the summer jobs program:

“The unemployment rate in the District of Columbia for August was unchanged from the revised July rate of 9.9% reported the District of Columbia’s Department of Employment Services. The number of jobs decreased by 26,100 in August which were mainly due to the Mayor’s 2010 Summer Youth Employment Program ending. The August national unemployment rate was 9.6 percent, up 0.1% from the revised rate in July 2010.”

One would think that all the paid volunteers on Fenty’s Green Team would have made a dent in the unemployment numbers. Oh well.

A breakdown of the employment numbers after the jump.

According to DOES:

“Professional and Business Services lost 2,000 jobs, after a 4,300 job gain in July. With employment at 156,400, jobs are up 8,900 or 6.0 percent from a year ago.

Educational and Health Services lost 1,500 jobs, after a loss of 400 jobs the prior month. With employment at 97,600, jobs are down 2,800 or -2.8 percent from a year ago.

Leisure and Hospitality lost 800 jobs following a gain of 100 jobs in July. With employment at 58,500, jobs are up 1,100 or 1.9 percent over the year.

Other Services lost 1,200 jobs, after a loss of 300 jobs the prior month. At 63,000, employment is down 1,600 or -2.5 percent from a year ago.

Financial Activities gained 100 jobs, after having no over-the-month job change the prior month. With employment at 26,200, jobs are down 300 or -1.1 percent from a year ago.

Information had no over-the-month job change, after no over-the-month job change in July. At 18,600, employment is down 200 or -1.1 percent from one year ago.

Construction gained 400 jobs, after a gain of 100 jobs in July. At 11,600, employment is up 300 or 2.7 percent from a year ago.

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities lost 300 jobs, after a loss of 200 jobs in July. With employment at 27,000, the sector is up 200 jobs or 0.7 percent from a year ago.

Manufacturing had no over-the-month job change.  Employment in manufacturing has remained constant.  With employment at 1,400, there was no change from a year ago.  Manufacturing is the smallest sector in the District accounting for less than 0.2 percent of total payroll employment.”