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What’s going on at D.C. lifestyle site Brightest Young Things? Just hours after managing editor Logan Donaldson was caught plagiarizing in the site’s spring and summer music guide—-and had the allegations shrugged off by site founder Svetlana Legetic—-there’s new evidence that this isn’t the staff’s first brush with stealing copy.

Donaldson’s March 15 story on the “All Time Great Yacht Rock Jams” includes passages identical to both a 2006 IGN article on yacht rock and the Wikipedia page for the melodious rock subgenre.

Here’s Wikipedia’s explanation of yacht rock:

“Yacht rock” is a pejorative nameused retrospectively to refer to the soft rock format that peaked in popularity between the years of 1975 and 1984. In part, the term relates to the stereotype of the yuppie yacht owner, enjoying smooth music while out for a sail. Additionally, since sailing was a popular leisure activity in Southern California, many “yacht rockers” made nautical references in their lyrics, videos, and album artwork, particularly the anthemic track “Sailing” by Christopher Cross. Notable artists also include Michael McDonald, Kenny Loggins, Boz Scaggs, Steely Dan and Toto.

And Brightest Young Things’, with similar phrasing from Wikipedia in bold:

For those of you tragically not in the know, “Yacht rock” is a name used to retrospectively describe the soft rock format that peaked in popularity between the years of 1975 and 1984. In part, the term relates to the stereotype of the yuppie yacht owner, enjoying smooth music while out for a sail. Additionally, since sailing was a popular leisure activity in Southern California, many “yacht rockers” made nautical references in their lyrics, videos, and album artwork, particularly the anthemic track “Sailing” by Christopher Cross. Notable artists also include Michael McDonald, Kenny Loggins, Boz Scaggs, Steely Dan and Toto.

Consider this IGN passage on Toto’s “Rosanna”:

How can a song dedicated to Rosanna Arquette not be a bona fide Yacht Rock staple?

And from Brightest Young Things, with the identical portion in bold:

How can a song dedicated to Rosanna Arquette not be a bona fide Yacht Rock staple?

IGN on Christopher Cross‘ “Sailing”:

“Sailing” may be the song everybody remembers from that time, but the album also yielded the Top 2 hit “Ride Like The Wind” and two additional Top 20 hits, “Never Be The Same” and “Say You’ll Be Mine.” But it was “Sailing” that took the Song of the Year award at the Grammys and it’s “Sailing” that has the fortunate (or unfortunate, as the case may be) distinction of actually having a title that fits the whole concept of Yacht Rock to a “T.”

And Brightest Young Things on “Sailing,” with similar passages in bold:

“Sailing” may be the song everybody remembers from Christopher Cross, but the same album also yielded the Top 2 hit “Ride Like The Wind” and two additional Top 20 hits, “Never Be The Same” and “Say You’ll Be Mine.” But it was “Sailing” that took the Song of the Year award at the Grammys and it’s “Sailing” that has the fortunate distinction of actually having a title that fits the whole concept of Yacht Rock to a “T.”

The only difference? Brightest Young Things dropped one of the jokes.

IGN on Steely Dan’s “Nineteen”:

The duo of Donald Fagan and Walter Becker brought soft faux jazz to the forefront with their intricate, quasi-progressive compositions and a light, airy feel that pissed off a whole generation of jazz purists at the same time that it climbed the pop charts, became an integral soundtrack to a generation, and provided untold amounts of samples for the world of rap.

Brightest Young Things’ version, with, you guessed it, similar sections in bold:

The duo of Donald Fagan and Walter Becker brought soft faux jazz to the forefront with their intricate, quasi-progressive compositions and a light, airy feel that pissed off a whole generation of jazz purists at the same time that it climbed the pop charts, became an integral soundtrack to a generation, and provided untold amounts of smooooth samples for the world of rap.

Do these guys even know anything about music? It’s getting to where you can’t even trust your local blogerati-cum-event promoters!

Legetic declined to comment on the newly-suspect article. “We are dealing with this internally and for the time being I have no further comment,” she writes in an email. As for Donaldson, Legetic tells DCist that she won’t ask him to resign.

Update, 5:20 p.m.: This post initially said the Brightest Young Things’ yacht rock didn’t have a byline when, in fact, Donaldson’s name is on it.