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What you said about what we said last week

Rob Kunzig’s cover story on George Pelecanos’ food and flavorful hometown received a warm welcome from readers who hinted at some territorial feelings about D.C.’s food scene (and would probably bristle at our use of the term “scene,” here). “Thanks, @wcp. Good to acknowledge @pelecanos1’s great #DC crime novels & his proud shunning of #foodie foolishness,” tweeted @McDorchester. @kimberlyrobin37 fangirled for a second: “Had no idea that at CF Folks I was sitting at the lunch counter of a George Pelecanos coffee shop.” “Fun profile of George Pelecanos in @wcp, told via his favorite restaurants,” tweeted @mathitak. But @robwein may have put it best (and we’d expect nothing less from a fellow writer): “The great ones make it look easy—#Pelecanos.”

Deliver Us From People

Things got a little more heated in response to Jessica Sidman’s column on Washington’s new and dizzying array of delivery options, “New World Order.” Surprisingly, hardly any accusations of laziness were hurled, and it was more a question of whether this city needs such a service. “Can D.C. sustain a coffee delivery service,” wondered our managing editor @wcpsarah? “No way Josè,” replied the aptly-named @DCoffeeSnob. “The best part of coffee is the atmosphere in a shop. That’s why people pay $5 for a latte.” But commenter swagv was plainly confused. “Why is Tony Chen practically being cited for inventing coffee delivery services when they have existed with trucks and bicycles throughout the world for several years now? Is this the ‘if it’s new to you, it’s new problem?” But JoDa is apparently a fan of the delivery-everything-all-the-time concept: “I’m happy to fork over a few dollars for the delivery, just on a cost/benefit analysis. Not having to put on shoes is just an added bonus.” And upon learning that Bud Light is the most popular beer Klink delivers, @grperk started trend-spotting like a seasoned pro: “Is Bud Light the new PBR?”

It Takes a District

Jayme McLellan, founding director of Civilian Art Projects, wrote us to share some of the credit given to her in Kriston Cappsreview of that gallery’s January exhibition. “Working in the arts in D.C. for 18 years, I can safely say there are many, many other key actors, important figures, and very talented artists also lifting up the scene. No one can do it alone.” McLellan gives credit to “Transformer, DC Art Center, WPA [Works Progress Administration], Hamiltonian, Artisphere, Katzen Museum, Kreeger Museum, the Hirshhorn, NMWA [National Museum of Women in the Arts], Provisions Library, Arlington Arts Center, Pleasant Plains, Hemphill, G Fine Art, Curators Office, ConnerSmith and the (e)merge art fair, Project Dispatch, the Pink Line Project, Anacostia Arts Center, the many DIY spaces … and so so so much more.” Did you get all that?

Hot-Blooded

And finally, @bcbolin vocalized what we were all thinking, but too shy to say, about the Fifty Shades of Grey-themed cocktail now available at City Perch in North Bethesda: “hot peppers by your stuff??”

Department of Corrections

Our cover story, “Hard Boiled,” misspelled Woodward Table chef Jeffrey Buben’s last name. It also misstated the location of the former Jefferson Coffee Shop. It is located on Jefferson Place NW, not Jefferson Street.