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A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from Washington City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com

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New York Times writer David Carr, who edited Washington City Paper from 1995 to 2000, died suddenly Thursday night. If you worked with him at City Paper and would like to share some memories, send them via email. You can also read his work in our archives.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • The city has given up on public buildings as a replacement for D.C. General. [Housing Complex]
  • Rose’s Luxury chef Aaron Silverman will host public preview dinners for his new restaurant in his own home. [Young & Hungry]
  • The Georgetown rabbi charged with videotaping women in a ritual bath may have recorded 150 women. [Post]
  • Hotel murder mystery leaves D.C. police searching for clues. [ABC7]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY:

Opportunity Cost: How a new loophole could give landlords a bigger edge on D.C. tenants.

Protect and Preserve: How MPD kept the peace among its own after a racially charged shooting.

Dance Off: Why Patty Boom Boom is closing, and why there’s a silver lining.

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Will Sommer (tips? wsommer@washingtoncitypaper.com)

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Aaron Wiener (tips? awiener@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Muriel Bowser takes a small step to clear the homeless shelter backlog. [Post]
  • Capitol Hill (broadly defined) is getting more than 5,000 new apartments in the next three years. [Hill Now]
  • Capitol Crossing construction on the 3rd Street Tunnel starts this month. [District Source]
  • Scared, knifeless libertarian seeks a place to stay in dangerous D.C. [Post]
  • A preview of the ornate Museum of the Bible. [Post]
  • Another new design for controversial Dupont church project. [UrbanTurf]
  • More young people are living in D.C., and fewer in the far-flung suburbs. [GGW]
  • Today on the market: A brick box in North Cleveland Park—-$850,000

ARTS LINKS, by Christina Cauterucci (tips? ccauterucci@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • How works from the American Art Museum inspired the look of the Sleepy Hollow ballet [Arts Desk]
  • Why Patty Boom Boom is closing, and why there’s a silver lining [Arts Desk]
  • Susan Burch‘s cheeky haikus are on signs all over downtown “tree boxes.” [Washingtonian]
  • The mayor of London toured the Smithsonian to convince officials to open an outpost there. [Post]
  • William Tucker is reviving a neo-soul and R&B radio station that was one of the first aimed at a black audience. [Washingtonian]
  • Inside Dupont Underground’s plans to become an arts space [D.C. Music Download]
  • There’s a high-school jazz band competition at this weekend’s Mid-Atlantic Jazz Festival. [Post]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Jessica Sidman (tips? jsidman@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Stefano Frigerio joins Fiola as executive chef. [Washingtonian]
  • You can find 18 of the most bitter cocktails in D.C. at Copycat Co. [Post]
  • Michelle Obama dines at Rose’s Luxury. [Eater]
  • Local Pinkberry stores will reopen under new owners. [WBJ]
  • Pairing classical music with local dishes [Express]
  • Chef Robert Wiedmaier‘s new Bethesda restaurant will be called Urban Heights. [Robert Dryer]
  • A guide to drink and oyster pairings [Drink DC]