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What you said about what we said last week

It’s hard to overstate how passionate Washington City Paper’s community of commenters is about last week’s cover package on Metro’s troubled times. In more than 60 comments, transit enthusiasts debated almost every angle while managing to keep the conversation civil and coherent. Prominently featured in the comments section on Aaron Wiener’s “Can Metro Ever Get Any Better?” was jamesbeaz: “I don’t know what else to say. I’m embarrassed and exhausted by the dysfunction of this city.” jamesbeaz railed (get it?) on Metro for several more paragraphs, urging District residents to look to our global neighbors to see what’s being built in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East—because an acute case of public infrastructure envy is just what Metro riders need.

Commenters largely agreed, although Metro had its defenders, especially among those readers who truly rely on those services for their commutes. Shenandoah Sue scolded jamesbeaz: “That’s quite some whine James…. The bus system could be better, but it’s pretty darn good for having made no concerted effort at improvement, and I for one am extremely grateful to have it.” NonStopSki agreed: “The Buses are a bright spot in the city.”

But in the melee we found no shortage of suggested fixes for Metro’s myriad woes. Fix the streetcars, Christine wrote: “DC needs to make all streetcar lanes dedicated to streetcars.” Just stick it to everyone living outside the city, suggested derleider: “F em. If they want shorter commutes then move closer in.” Or focus on earning their trust to wheedle some more cash from them. HellOnWheelz said, “The suburbs aren’t giving MetroRail more money because the Authority can’t be trusted,” before providing a lengthy, bulleted list of all the ways Metro misspends. Or maybe keep cutting! “Metro needs to seriously look within for cuts. They are too bloated in staff and need to start making cuts to be more viable and profitable,” said DupontNW. ex-14thandYou was on hand to remind us that money is just a construct, man: “Metro doesn’t need to be profitable—it just needs to do its job.”

Meanwhile, the thousands spent on the Silver Line ads rubbed @TurboWhitey (among many others) the wrong way: “That money would have done wonders for some escalators.”

Quit Busking My Chops

“No please,” pleaded LDJ. “So many buskers out there who can’t play an instrument to begin with and over-amplify to boot. The relative quite of the DC’s metro stations is one of the good things about the system.” Fabrisse claimed to have taken the most direct approach we can think of to ensuring a silent commute: “When I lived in Boston, I paid some buskers $20 to shut up until they saw me get on a train.” A twenty?! What are you, made of gold?

No Reservations

Paying extra for a dinner reservation? You either hate it or you shrug it off. “I can’t think of a douchy-er thing to do,” commented loki5586. It’s a slippery slope, cautioned Hawkeye15: “So how long until they are charging for all of their reservations? Xavier_from_new_york couldn’t muster any sympathy: “Finally, the rich and influential catch a break.”

Department of Corrections

Due to a reporting error, Dean Essner’s review of Paperhaus’ self-titled debut LP referred to Alex Tebeleff as the album’s lead songwriter. The album was written by the entire band. A reporting error in Carey Hodges’ review of Stranger in the Alps’ Pattern Matching incorrectly referred to one of their albums as Honey If You Will. It’s actually called Honey If You’re Lucky.