Stadium Club

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Rapper Fetty Wap‘s “Trap Queen” may be the song of the summer, but its popularity didn’t stop him from reportedly getting rolled at glamorous and troubled District strip club Stadium Club on Saturday night. While Fetty Wap denies being jumped, gossip website MediaTakeOut insists that he got the worse of an altercation with some “DC GOONS” that allegedly left him nearly losing his weave in the scuffle.

If the fracas really happened, it would put Fetty Wap alongside Migos and Drake on the list of rappers who have had unflattering run-ins at Stadium. But the incident isn’t nearly the biggest problem looming for the strip club, which was once majority-owned by Golden State Warriors player Andre Iguodala and remained tied to him through a complicated ownership structure.

As the summer comes to a close, Stadium faces an existential threat from some people who will probably never feud with Drake: the members of the District’s Board of Zoning Adjustment.

Stadium, where women take off their clothes for money, has somehow managed to avoid being classified as a “Sexually Oriented Business Establishment.” If the city decides that the Woodridge strip club meets those criteria, though, it could be in violation of local zoning rules.

Stadium’s endless fight with a group of Ward 5 residents over the definition of a “Sexually Oriented Business Establishment” came back to the BZA in June, where visibly uncomfortable BZA members were forced to debate issues like how “lingering” a caress had to be to qualify as a “fondle.”

“[It] makes me a bit uncomfortable!” said BZA Chairman Lloyd J. Jordan, as he read through zoning regulation passages on masturbation. “Can we just dim the lights and then we can talk about it?”

BZA members grappled with a variety of strip clubs issues, including whether Stadium dancers are trying to arouse the club’s patrons. For BZA member Robert Miller, the answer was clear.

“I think the dancers are bending over, exposing their…anatomical areas, their breasts, their genitals, their buttocks,” Miller said. “They’re bending over in a very provocative way to get the tips they’re trying to earn for a living. For me, that’s enough. That’s what a strip club is designed to do.”

At an Aug. 4 hearing, commissioners tentatively ruled, by split vote, in favor of classifying Stadium as an SOBE. On Sept. 22, they’ll meet again to vote on a final order. If no BZA members change their votes by then, that could leave Stadium appealing the order—or changing its business model or shutting down entirely to comply with the zoning decision.  

It’s not clear how involved Iguodala, the 2015 NBA Finals MVP, remains with the strip club. Last year, Iguodala, who purportedly wanted nothing to do with the business when a company he owned bought the mortgage in a real estate play, passed his stake in the club to his business manager. Still, he kept the right to have a say in how the shares are used. Another Iguodala-tied company intended at one point to buy the land under Stadium, but property records show the deal hasn’t gone through.

Both Iguodala’s spokesman and a Stadium attorney, who has previously done unrelated legal work for the NBA star, didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Photo by Darrow Montgomery