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Eric Alterman has an article in the New Yorker this week about the state of the newspaper industry. He makes some great points, but also makes a statement that is more a wail of liberal anguish than a prediction that can be supported by history: the newspaper is in its death throes. (If that were true why would anyone care about this man’s job?)

Seems to me that what he means to say is that the newspaper as we know it is dying.

But hasn’t that been happening for a long time? Morning and evening editions? Several dailies in every large town?

Could it be that the newspaper-in-a-diminished-form will coexist with the internet the same way that movies and television coexist? Or the way that MP3s and vinyl coexist?