Do you have a plan to vote?

Let us tell you the information you need to register and cast a ballot in D.C.

We can't make City Paper without you

$
$
$

Your contribution is appreciated.

Was there a more important music story this decade than the dramatic changes to the recording business? Every rule was broken, from the ways companies distribute music to how we listen to it—-or so it would seem. Writing in our Music in Review issue, Brent Burton details five myths about the end of the music industry. He writes:

Though the past decade has offered no hint that the record business can, or will, ever revisit its boom-time high—achieved, in part, by the conversion from vinyl to CD—the industry is still responsible for some rather large figures. In 2008, a year in which digital album sales were up 32 percent, consumers bought more than 400 million albums, a tally that does not include digital singles or ringtones. That’s lower than in 2000, to be sure, but those CD sales still brought in about $6.5 billion.

Read his entire list here.

Though the past decade has offered no hint that the record business can, or will, ever revisit its boom-time high—achieved, in part, by the conversion from vinyl to CD—the industry is still responsible for some rather large figures. In 2008, a year in which digital album sales were up 32 percent, consumers bought more than 400 million albums, a tally that does not include digital singles or ringtones. That’s lower than in 2000, to be sure, but those CD sales still brought in about $6.5 billion.