With no discernable common thread in its programming, this collection of shorts demonstrates the full spectrum of possibility within an overlooked genre: professional and. D.I.Y., humorous and dramatic, documentary and fiction. While the results vary, the placement of Denis Villeneuve’s Next Floor-perhaps an unfair touchstone given its positive reception at Cannes and recent screenings at the Hirshhorn –ensures that audiences will come away satiated.
Next Floor: A wonderfully inventive glimpse into the macabre dining habits of the upper crust, Next Floor’s fusion of social commentary and grotesque spectacle plays like an instant classic.
Lift:  Predictable and desperately quirky tale of furtive glances in a corporate park elevator that is far less memorable than Aerosmith’s suggestive ode to a similar concept. “Mr. Tyler, going down?”
Chapter 21: With the subtly of a blunt object, Chapter 21 conclusively proves that the accumulated complexity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be reduced to the fact that, deep down, we are all the same. Someone give Netanyahu a lift to next week’s screening!
Telemafia: An ill-conceived skit presumably conceived at improv night at the Ha Ha Hole, Telemafia illustrates what happens when a weenie telemarketer messes with the wrong paisan. In the hackneyed parlance of the film:  momma mia, it’s one unfunny meatball!
Cupid: What begins as a Pushing Daisies-like combination of whimsy and schmaltz degrades into a cheesy song and dance number starring the greasiest depiction of the god of desire ever put to film.
Visiting Hours: A simplistic look at the foibles of generational difference and acculturation, Visiting Hours’ intentions are sincere if clumsily executed.
The Sublet: Unpleasant old coot with olfactory dysfunction and a well-intentioned gardener inadvertently join forces in this smirk-worthy farce.
Sister Wife: A rare glimpse into the psychosis-inducing world of sister wifehood, this short doc provides one Mormon woman’s complex perspective on the unsavory practice. What it lacks in visual imagery (read: her taking a bath) it makes up for in raw emotion.
Worked for Me: Resembling a bizarro Paxil commercial, Worked for Me proves that getting over a painful break up is as easy as learning a foreign language or getting a pet. Man up, Keats!
Baines: Incorporating familiar action movie tropes (stoic assassin, two-timing partners) into a lean and entertaining 20-minute thriller, Baines renders convoluted back-stories irrelevant.
Showcase 2 will screen on the following days:
Saturday, September 11 @ 6:00pm @ U.S. Navy Memorial Heritage Center
(followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers)
Sunday, September 12 @ 4:00pm @ Landmark’s E Street Cinema
Tuesday, September 14 @ 3:00pm @ Landmark’s E Street Cinema

With no discernable common thread in its programming, this collection of shorts demonstrates the full spectrum of possibility within an overlooked genre: professional and. D.I.Y., humorous and dramatic, documentary and fiction. While the results vary, the placement of Denis Villeneuve’s Next Floor—-perhaps an unfair touchstone given its positive reception at Cannes and recent screenings at the Hirshhorn—-ensures that audiences will come away satiated.

Next Floor: A wonderfully inventive glimpse into the macabre dining habits of the upper crust, Next Floor is a fusion of social commentary and grotesque spectacle that plays like an instant classic.

Lift: Predictable and desperately quirky tale of furtive glances in a corporate park elevator that is far less memorable than Aerosmith’s suggestive ode to a similar concept. “Mr. Tyler, going down?”

Chapter 21: With the subtly of a blunt object, Chapter 21 conclusively proves that the accumulated complexity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be reduced to the fact that, deep down, we are all the same. Someone give Netanyahu a lift to today’s screening!

Telemafia: An ill-conceived skit presumably conceived at improv night at the Ha Ha Hole, Telemafia illustrates what happens when a weenie telemarketer messes with the wrong paisan. In the hackneyed parlance of the film:  Mamma mia, it’s one unfunny meatball!

Cupid: What begins as a Pushing Daisies-like combination of whimsy and schmaltz degrades into a cheesy song-and-dance number starring the greasiest depiction of the god of desire ever put to film.

Visiting Hours: A simplistic look at the foibles of generational difference and acculturation, Visiting Hours has sincere intentions and clumsy execution.

The Sublet: Unpleasant old coot with olfactory dysfunction and a well-intentioned gardener inadvertently join forces in this smirk-worthy farce.

Sister Wife: A rare glimpse into the psychosis-inducing world of sister-wifehood, this short doc provides one Mormon woman’s complex perspective on the unsavory practice. What it lacks in visual imagery (read: her taking a bath) it makes up for in raw emotion.

Worked for Me: Resembling a bizarro Paxil commercial, Worked for Me proves that getting over a painful break up is as easy as learning a foreign language or getting a pet. Man up, Keats!

Baines: Incorporating familiar action-movie tropes (stoic assassin, two-timing partners) into a lean and entertaining 20-minute thriller, Baines renders convoluted back-stories irrelevant.

Showcase 2 shows today at 3 p.m. at Landmark’s E Street Cinema.