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Jonna McKone has this week’s cover story with her look at the institutionalization of local graffiti culture via galleries, nonprofits, and even government programs—-and what that means for the form itself. Bob Mondello leads this week’s arts section with a review of Imagining Madoff—-the long-delayed Deb Margolin play that generated a national controversy when one of its original characters, the Jewish literary figure Elie Wiesel, threatened to sue. Rebecca J. Ritzel also reviews a play about two people sitting around drinking, The Stenographer at Venus Theatre. Ally Schweitzer reviews two big indie-rock releases: The debut of supergroup Wild Flag and the sophomore LP from local scene standard-bearers Deleted Scenes. Joe Warminsky reviews the new record from D.C. glam mystery Edie Sedgwick. Tricia Olszewski sees two films with striking, glazed-over aesthetics and little else: Bellflower and Mr. Nice. And in One Track Mind, Ryan Little talks to Regents, whose members are veterans of some D.C. hardcore but have a nice song about Baltimore.