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For members of the cult of John Reis and Rick Froberg—the two garage-rock heavyweights from Rocket From the Crypt and Drive Like Jehu—the 2005 demise of their band Hot Snakes felt like a knife in the gut. They went on to form Obits and The Night Marchers, temporarily appeasing their rabid fanbase (which is composed mostly of alternative-weekly contributors), but news of a Hot Snakes reunion takes the cake. The group’s sparse East Coast “tour” consists only of tonight’s show at Rock & Roll Hotel and the Metallica-curated Orion Music Festival in Atlantic City, N.J., then a final show at All Tomorrow’s Parties in Asbury Park, N.J., this September. Consider us very lucky. Plus, tonight’s opener is History Repeated, which features John Stabb, a man whose storied tenure with Government Issue has earned him his own loyal flock of followers. Hot Snakes performs with History Repeated and Last Year’s Men at 9 p.m. at Rock & Roll Hotel, 1353 H St. NE. Update: This show has sold out. rockandrollhoteldc.com. (202) 388-7625. (Matt Siblo)

SATURDAY

You know those people running around in funny-looking rubber foot gloves? Yeah, the Naked Foot 5K isn’t about that. Rather, organizers say, it’s about running any way you want, whether in the fanciest shock-absorbing sneakers or no shoes at all. (But if it gets you into “minimalist running,” so much the better.) Today at Hudson Trail Outfitters in Tenleytown, naturopathic physician Robyn Hughes leads a discussion about minimalist and barefoot running, followed by a “Learn to Run” clinic sponsored by shoe company Altra Footwear. Then on Sunday, runners converge at Chevy Chase’s Meadowbrook Park for the adult 5K (and a free 1K for the kids). The fainter of foot can ease into the whole idea with a “Bare Life” expo that includes organic foods, holistic medical products, running clinics, foot painting and massages, and Parkour. It seems the point is to inculcate kids with the values of an active lifestyle, since hardly any kids run around barefoot in parks anymore. The Naked Foot education day begins at 1 p.m. at Hudson Trail Outfitters, 4530 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. The 5K begins at 9 a.m. Sunday at Meadowbrook Park, 7901 Meadowbrook Lane, Chevy Chase. Registration $40. The free kids 1k begins at 8:30 a.m.; Bare Life Expo at 10 a.m. thenakedfoot5k.com. (Lydia DePillis)

SUNDAY

TableTribes is a pop-up picnic series that asks more of its guests than most restaurants ever could. Like the No. 68 Project, the temporary dining experience Jill Richmond brought from London in 2011, TableTribes—founded by No. 68 Project’s Hosan Lee—desires only the most fascinating guests. Accordingly, wannabe picnickers must fill out an application to be invited. “What does your life taste like as a pie?” it asks, and “Ask a friend/loved one about their favorite food memory.” It’s a little much, but TableTribes promises a return on the time investment (and $65 price of admission): In a release, Lee says TableTribes’ mission is to “facilitate authentic relationship building” through food and drink. “By engaging in meaningful conversation over a shared meal, we start to break down boundaries and judgment that we not only have towards others, but also within ourselves.” For its debut picnic today, which will take place somewhere in Georgetown (the location isn’t announced until the day before), cocktail artisan and consultant JP Caceres is the featured “drink collaborator”; “food collaborators” had not been announced at press time. Speakers include a handful of entrepreneurs and consultants, including D.C. Central Kitchen’s founding president Robert Egger. So while the concept might be a little lofty, TableTribes could offer a solution to one of the gravest threats to dinner: bad company. TableTribes hosts its first picnic today at an undisclosed location. More picnics are planned Sundays through Aug. 26. tabletribes.com. (Ally Schweitzer)

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Barefoot photo by Flickr user Krikit used under a Creative Commons license.