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This week, Oddisee gets (kind of) candid, while Wale outlines the ills of low self-esteem mixed with substance abuse and social media. These are the Breaks.

Oddisee Opens Up

Despite being a natural introvert, Oddisee is quite adept at channeling his feelings through his music. Ironically, that occasional tendency towards isolation bleeds through on “Belong to the World.” Although the song elicits a sunny vibe, the keys on the sample, the skittering hi-hats, and wailing background vocals on the bridge make it feel haunted. Still, there’s something positive about a loner finding his place with the masses through music: “Somebody asked, ‘What do you claim?’ I belong to the world,” he says.

He also released a crisp, black-and-white video for “CounterClockwise.” While everyone else in the video moves backwards in slow motion, Oddisee goes against the grain, forging ahead. Metaphoric? Of course. Both songs will be included on his forthcoming album, The Good Fight, out May 5.

Wale Descends Into the World of Girls on Drugs

https://twitter.com/Wale/status/588934079762014211

This early morning tweet from Wale is exceptionally relevant, considering the release of his video for “The Girls on Drugs” this week. Despite the obvious negative connotation of the title, the sped-up Janet Jackson sample and dance-ready production betray the song’s true meaning, which the video illustrates. It examines the depths of insecurity, and how some opt to drown their sorrows in illicit substances and Instagram likes. Speaking of which, director Dre Films deserves credit for the authenticity of the cracked iPhone-screen shot that pops up around the two-minute mark.

Dre also deserves credit for depicting the feeling of intoxication as being blissfully lost inside of a series of prisms. There’s also a breakout scene where Wale demonstrates his acting chops while trying to talk some sense into the video’s main character as her life spirals out of control. It’s not exactly Oscar-worthy, but it helps to frame the video’s narrative.

Photo by Chris Suspect