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* D.C. Mayoral candidate Leo Alexander only has 700 bucks in the war chest, and $200 of it came from Phyllis Schlafly’s Eagle Forum. That’s rough, dude.

* Woman marries her partner in D.C., but is denied a name change in her home of Tennessee, on account of her absurd document from the nation’s capital claiming her to be married—-to a woman!

* The Bilerico Project takes the temperature of gay online media. Zack Rosen of the New Gay submits: “The state of gay online media is, simply, that it exists.”

* In the Washington Post, Mark Judge calls for more male teachers in Catholic schools, for feminism:

[T]his is the kind of feminism that can sometimes be best delivered by a man. This year girls basketball team at St. Mary’s won the league championship. As a reward the girls on the team got to come to school out of uniform, wearing whatever ever t-shirts they wanted to. The boys, whose team had not done as well, were sulking around school, bristling whenever the girls would brag. I noticed they were whispering to each other, “Yeah, but girls basketball is not a sport.” They would never say in front of any teachers, 90 percent of whom are women. But then the sixth grade came into my classroom in the afternoon and, the boys saw me standing in the front and they let themselves go. “It’s not a sport!” they cried. They called out, men to man, for validation—-“Mr. Judge, girls basketball is not a sport! Right?”

I was surprised. I grew up in the 1970s, and even in those dark ages we would never have claimed that women’s basketball was not a sport. Had thing moved that far backwards? Actually, I answered, not only is it a sport, it’s a lot more interesting than men’s basketball. Men’s basketball has become a lot of dunking. In women’s basketball there is strategy, jump-shots, thinking.

The boys looked at me suspiciously for a few seconds. But then they seemed to take it in.

* So sorry to bother you, via Feministe: How men and women pitch stories to the Awl. According to the site: “The emails from men are pretty direct. The emails from women are often kind of . . . apologetic!”

Photo via Nationaal Archief