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We’ve covered the museums vying for spots as close as they can manage to the National Mall: There’s the National Museum of the American People, the National Women’s History Museum, and the National Museum of the American Latino, for starters.

But then there are those with smaller ambitions. A handful of passionate foundations just want a little piece of real estate somewhere in the nation’s capital, and have managed to get a senator or representative to sponsor their authorizing legislation. These ones are on the agenda for a meeting of the the National Capital Memorials Advisory Commission next week:

  • The Adams Memorial Foundation, which was given permission a decade ago to establish a memorial in D.C., will present a study of possible sites.
  • California Rep. Sam Farr and a bunch of other Democrats have sponsored legislation to authorize the Peace Corps Commemorative Foundation to build a memorial in honor of “the formation of the Peace Corps and the ideals of world peace and friendship upon which the Peace Corps was founded.”
  • Senators Joe Lieberman and Chuck Grassley are pushing a bill that would allow the National Mall Liberty Fund to establish a memorial to African Americans who fought in the American Revolution that would “promote healing of long-festering wounds that date from slavery and the battle against segregation and discrimination.”
  • Somewhat duplicatively, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton has sponsored legislation to allow the Benjamin Harrison Society to establish a non-race-specific memorial to the “patriots” who fought in the American Revolution.

Meanwhile, to make them all more expensive and isolationist, Rep. Dale Kildee—-who represents a district that includes Flint, Michigan—-has sponsored a bill that would require all commemorative works in D.C. to be made of materials manufactured or produced in the United States. That may be a response to the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial, which incurred Made-in-USA ire for being made in China.