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This news just crossed my desk: The D.C. branch of Brasserie Les Halles, best known as one of Anthony Bourdain‘s last remaining ties to the kitchen, has closed or will be closing, according to a short item in the Washington Post.

If you read through the comments on the Post‘s item, there is some confusion on when the place will be closing. I’m going to try to track down more information as the day progresses. I’m also going to try to get a comment from my new BFF, Bourdain, and see what he thinks. More as I know it.

UPDATE: I just got a press release this morning from BWF Communications saying the news is true. Les Halles served its last meal on Monday, which means that Wednesday night’s Beaujolais Nouveau party is no mas, if I can mix my languages here, and I will.

Photo courtesy of Anthony Bourdain No Reservations.

From the BWF press release:

According to proprietor Philippe Lajaunie, the restaurant has reached the end of its lease at 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, ending a 15 year run in the nation’s capital. “While this is a sad occasion, it is a natural progression, as our lease is over,” said Lajaunie. “I don’t have the words to express my gratitude to the many friends we have in Washington, from our loyal customers, to the Mayor, the City Council and staffers who have been tremendous neighbors. I hope we will still have the chance to see many of these people in New York City.”

Brasserie Les Halles opened in the Penn Quarter when downtown was considered a virtual no-man’s land in the evening, perfectly positioned to share in the area’s growth, into a vibrant, bustling business and residential district. It came on the scene offering American beef cut and prepared French style – one of the earliest in the city to serve Onglet, the French cut Hanger Steak now so common on restaurant menus. Brasserie Les Halles was also one of the first to offer continuous service, with the full menu available until midnight, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

Breakfast. Lunch, afternoon thé or a late dinner on the restaurant’s expansive terrace had the ability to not just evoke thoughts of Paris, but to truly transport one.

Les Halles was home to two of Washington’s biggest annual party – July’s Annual Bastille Day Race & Celebration, part of the restaurant’s Liberty Festival celebrating the national holidays of the USA and France (July 4-14), and Beaujolais Nouveau, a midnight party each November.

Of course, today’s closing also means the cancellation of Les Halles Washington’s 2008 Beaujolais Nouveau celebration, which had been scheduled for this Wednesday night, November 19, into the wee hours of Thursday morning – ending Washington’s original midnight Beaujolais Nouveau party.