Credit: Andrew Giambrone

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Few things are as frustrating as being in a rush to get somewhere, spotting a single bike left at a Capital Bikeshare station, and running over only to find a work-order ticket attached to the front. But, sometimes, life gives you lemons. And, even less frequently, they come in the form of free rideshare credit.

In the bag rack of a Capital Bikeshare bike at the 17th Street and New Hampshire Avenue NW dock Wednesday morning was the above promotion for “$20—$50” in Lyft ride credit. The grainy-looking company logo on the back of the iPhone-sized printout looked like a scam.

In fact, it was not. A representative of Lyft confirms that the redemption code provided on the card was legitimate, offering 10 $5 credits to a new user. (Unfortunately, I’m not one: Entering the 10 digit password under the app’s “Payment” tab resulted in “This code is only valid for new users” in red. Sad!)

Since you were wondering: Capital Bikeshare does not permit handouts or flyers to be placed on its bikes. Who, then, was the scofflaw who put it there?

“It looks like a passenger or driver created this card on their own and left it on the bike,” the Lyft rep says of the referral. “We’ll be sure to pass this along to our team so we can follow up with them on this.”

Anyone want $50 in free Lyft credit?