The shitshow might really be over now. The Council held its final vote on the fiscal year 2021 budget on Tuesday and, just as in past meetings, moments between members became tense and devolved into chaos.

A notable kerfuffle came after At-Large Councilmember Elissa Silverman introduced her Excluded Workers Amendment Act, which sought to tweak a cash assistance program by expanding eligibility to informal economy workers, in addition to undocumented workers, and making dollars nontaxable.   

Chairman Phil Mendelson had problems with the eligibility definition being too broad and making implementation tricky. “Councilmember Silverman, you never came to me and said can we discuss different language,” Mendelson said in a frustrated tone of voice. But Silverman said she told Mendelson to call her if he had a problem with her amendment and he did not. “I am tired of your condescension and patronizing to me,” she said. “This is not about me not coming to you.” The chairman apologized, saying he did not intend to “belittle” her.     

The amendment was ultimately approved, with only two members voting against it: Mendelson and lameduck Councilmember Brandon Todd from Ward 4. This marks a victory for street vendors, day laborers, and other cash economy workers who’ve been visiting councilmembers at their homes to advocate for themselves. 

The budget process captured in two tweets:

The Council unanimously approved the Budget Support Act, or statutory changes that are necessary to implement the budget. Other highlights in the amalgamation of legislation include a new program that provides tax incentives for the construction of affordable housing, a 10-year extension of current rent control laws (despite opposition from tenant advocates who want reform), and more transparency by applying the Open Meetings Act to charter schools.       

The budget still needs to be signed by Mayor Muriel Bowser, who has some qualms, and requires congressional approval. 

—Amanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com)

SponsoredAre you considering a career change? Is a coding bootcamp right for you? Take this quiz from Flatiron School. 

CITY DESK LINKS, by Amanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com)      

  • At Wednesday’s press conference, Bowser clarified that those exempted from a 14-day quarantine related to travel include people traveling for essential government functions, business, care for elderly or dependents, and law enforcement or court orders. [Twitter

  • As of July 28, D.C. reported one additional death related to COVID-19 and 54 new positive cases, bringing the total numbers to 584 and 11,999, respectively. Cases in the community are increasing and, per contact tracing, a miniscule percentage are connected to quarantine cases. [EOM

  • Why are parents raising money for student tablets when the Bowser administration assured the Council that DC Public Schools will have technology for remote learning covered? [WCP]

  • Metro is losing $2 million in revenue everyday due to the pandemic. [WTOP]

  • Folks are struggling to afford rent. D.C. law requires a landlord to offer a repayment plan if a tenant is struggling. Have you entered into an agreement with your landlord? Perhaps your landlord forgave your rent entirely? Let City Paper know by filling out a short survey. [WCP]

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Mitch Ryals (tips? mryals@washingtoncitypaper.com

  • Johnny Business gets (most of) the Council’s approval. [WCP]

  • Randy Downs throws the first punch in the Ward 2 General Election. He’s running as an independent against Ward 2 Councilmember Brooke Pinto. [Twitter]

  • Legislation to subsidize affordable housing in wealthy neighborhoods remains in the budget. [WBJ]

  • Maryland is going to stop paying for coronavirus testing in nursing homes. [Post]

  • Which ANCs have open seats? [Open ANC]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com

  • Chef Mike Friedman will operate a Jewish deli out of All-Purpose Pizzeria in Shaw on Fridays through Sundays. [WCP]

  • A guide to George Avenue’s Caribbean restaurants. [Post]

  • Call Your Mother’s Georgetown location opened this morning. [Eater DC]

  • Three food editors on the ethics of dining out during a pandemic. [Eater]

ARTS LINKS, by Kayla Randall (tips? krandall@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • The Kennedy Center laid off 64 employees and cut 47 vacant positions. [Post]

  • DCPL executive director Richard Reyes-Gavilan talks about how the library is facing the unprecedented difficulties of 2020. [Kojo Nnamdi Show]

  • American Shakespeare Center has begun its live performances. [DC Theatre Scene]

SPORTS LINKS, by Kelyn Soong (tips? ksoong@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • After 142 days away, the Caps will play again today in an exhibition against the Carolina Hurricanes. [NBC Sports Washington]

  • The Nats’ three-game series in Miami this weekend has been postponed after the Marlins reported 17 positive coronavirus cases between players and coaches since Opening Day. [Federal Baseball, CBS Sports]

  • Aerial Powers scored a career-high 27 points to lead the Mystics over the Connecticut Sun, 94-89, and the defending WNBA champs are 2-0 to start the season. [AP]

CITY LIGHTS, by Emma Sarappo (Love this section? Get the full newsletter here. Tips? esarappo@washingtoncitypaper.com)

We’re bringing you the best things to watch,  read, make, and do from the comfort of your home while social distancing.

Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here. Send tips, ideas, and comments to newsletters@washingtoncitypaper.com.