THE NEWS:

Election Day is just FIVE days away. The pandemic has changed everything, including D.C.’s June 2 primary. Officials are encouraging everyone to vote by mail. Didn’t request a mail-in ballot by this past Tuesday’s deadline? Vote centers are open and available to you. (More information here.)

There are competitive races in Ward 2, Ward 4, Ward 7, and Ward 8. It’s a high-stakes primary—for example,Jack Evans, who resigned from the D.C. Council in the midst of an ethics scandal, is running for the seat he vacated. 

Are you still trying to make up your mind about who to vote for if you live in one of these competitive wards? To help readers out, City Paper put together an election guide, led by Loose Lips Mitch Ryals. You told us the issues you cared about, and then we asked candidates to answer policy questions that’ll help you understand what kind of Democrat they are and how they’ll lead if elected to Council.

Those questions readers wanted answers to include “Should D.C. increase or decrease the size of its police force?” “What’s the ideal rent control scheme?” and “Do you support ranked choice voting in D.C.?” 

Every Democrat running in a competitive race in the June 2 primary jumped on the phone with a City Paper reporter to answer your questions, except Ward 8 candidates Mike Austin and Trayon White Sr. Read how candidates would help small businesses struggling in the pandemic and what they are doing in quarantine. Guess which candidate is spending her days at home watching little otters on YouTube?  —Amanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com)

CITY DESK LINKS, byAmanda Michelle Gomez (tips? agomez@washingtoncitypaper.com

  • There is no mayoral press conference on COVID-19 today.  

  • D.C. reported eight additional deaths related to COVID-19, meaning 453 D.C. residents have died of the disease. As of May 27, 8,492 D.C. residents have tested positive for COVID-19 while 36,284 have tested in total. DC Health says D.C. continues to meet metrics needed for a Phase 1, including a 15-day decrease in community spread. [EOM

  • D.C. will begin gradually reopening Friday, but does the public health data say we’re ready? Depends on who you ask. [WCP]

  • “I don’t want to go back to that hell hole.” [WCP]

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Mitch Ryals (tips? mryals@washingtoncitypaper.com

  • A pro-charter school group is going on the attack this election cycle. [WCP]

  • D.C. Public Charter School Board tapped the former St. Paul, Minn. school official, Michelle Walker-Davis, as executive director. [Post]

  • D.C. BOE responds to a lawsuit from Ward 8 residents alleging voter discrimination. [Twitter]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com

  • Settling the bill at restaurants and bars won’t be the same after COVID-19. Is the demand for contactless payment giving the cashless movement forward momentum? [WCP]

  • Restaurants and bars with outdoor seating can serve customers starting tomorrow. [WCP]

  • More lenient permanent alcohol rules are on the horizon. [WBJ]

ARTS LINKS, by Kayla Randall (tips? krandall@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • The pandemic presents a unique set of challenges for artists who are also essential workers. [WCP]

  • Howard University is broadening its art reach with well designed virtual exhibitions. [WCP]

  • Locals are getting creative with quarantine art. [Washingtonian]

SPORTS LINKS, by Kelyn Soong (tips? ksoong@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Baseball, sunflower seeds, and spitting: an American tradition. [WCP]

  • All nine NWSL teams, including the Washington Spirit, will participate in the Challenge Cup, a 25-game tournament in Utah from June 27 to July 26. [SI]

  • Mac McClung is going to Texas Tech. [Casual Hoya]

CITY LIGHTS, byEmma Sarappo (Love this section? Get the full newsletter here. Tips? esarappo@washingtoncitypaper.com)

We’re bringing you the best things to watch, read, make, and do from the comfort of your home while social distancing.

Sign up: To get District Line Daily—or any of our other email newsletters—sent straight to your mailbox, click here. Send tips, ideas, and comments to newsletters@washingtoncitypaper.com.