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24

M O N D A Y

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As if being a spy weren’t hard enough, the 432 known intelligence agents of the Civil War had to ply their trade without the James Bond-style gadgetry made possible by modern technology. Instead, microfilm, hot-air balloons, and the telegraph played integral roles in their subversive networks. Gettysburg, Pa., author Donald E. Markle discusses his book Spies and Spymasters of the Civil War and the ingenious tactics that these agents—women, African-Americans, Canadians, and Europeans among them—used for the clandestine acquisition and transmission of information. At 6 p.m. at the Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden’s Ring Auditorium, 8th & Independence Ave. SW. $15. For reservations call (202) 357-3030. (CP)