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Last winter, Mayor Marion Barry told the teen-age audience of the C-SPAN show Close Up that he was opposed to a youth curfew. D.C. police are already overworked and underpaid, he explained, and the city had no extra money to expand their duties. The District’s financial status hasn’t improved, but Barry—who is facing increasing pressure from parents and police to approve the D.C. Council’s proposed curfew—now seems eager to deploy cops to round up wayward kids. At a public hearing last week, Barry tried to persuade 50 representatives from teen groups that a curfew wouldn’t punish “good” kids and cited the proven results of curfews in other big cities. If instituted, Barry said, D.C.’s curfew would exempt kids on their way home, running errands, or in the company of adults. The kids seemed unswayed by Barry’s assurances. Now the mayor must choose between appeasing citizens of voting age or younger constituents, who aren’t interested in municipal parenting.