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Television has been justly accused of shrinking the attention spans of its viewers, and we are now at the point where people are becoming nostalgic for those faraway days of the ’80s. Such forgetfulness should work to this collection’s benefit, because most of the 48 opening theme songs on these three discs—and many, many more—were released by the TeeVee Toons label as recently as 1987. Where the TeeVee discs generally used recordings from the actual shows, Tube generally prefers the album or single versions. Which is not always a successful choice. After all, the pleasure in hearing these cuts is largely Pavlovian, the result of years spent wasting away with Rockford, Mary, Ted, Lou, Bob, Crockett and Tubbs, Keith and Laurie, B.J. and the Bear. OK, I go too far. But while Cyndi Grecco’s radio hit “Making Our Dreams Come True” is basically the chipper one we recall from Laverne & Shirley, Sonny Curtis’ countrified “Love Is All Around” from The Mary Tyler Moore Show is just different enough to be completely annoying. After all, does anyone care about the second verse? (Where it’s “men” who are all around drawn by “that sexy look”? Heavens, Mare!) Compiler Lisa Sutton is nothing if not enthusiastic—even such forgettable short-run fare as Nanny and the Professor rates effusive praise. And though he had a pleasant voice, one hesitates to call “And Then There’s Maude” ‘s crooner, the late Donny Hathaway an “R&B legend.” It is depressingly fascinating to learn that Ray Charles sang the Three’s Company theme its first season, only to be replaced by—gasp—Alan Thicke! Still, as the trend is for no opening theme song, we may never again watch a show with lyrics like these from Wonder Woman: “In your satin tights, fighting for your rights!” Or the Banana Splits’ “making a mess of fun!” I prefer the studio singers’ syndicated version of the Love American Style theme to the original take by the Cowsills, but any way you sing it, you can’t beat lines like “And by the dawn’s early light, my love, I will defend your right to [crescendo!] love, American style! (Freer than the land of the free-ee- ee-eee!)” In addition to resurrecting the Waitresses’ too-hip-for- prime-time “Square Pegs” ditty, Tube Tunes does a valuable service by revealing Carroll O’Connor’s garbled last line from All in the Family‘s theme: “Gee our old LaSalle ran great.”