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AFTER READING “POT Roast,” (The District Line, 4/7), it occurs to me that you have a serious hang-up about personal appearance.

My mother and I would like you to know that she has never met Bob Guccione Jr., or made love to him. However, I do listen to my AC/DC records on E-L-E-V-E-N.

Sorry, my handlers didn’t tell me that “having a bad hair day” made me an undesirable element when it came to advocating social change. Yes, I do only own two pairs of pants. That’s because I have spent every penny I own on something I believe in: freedom and equal rights. Material possessions don’t mean much to people who are being oppressed because they know it can be taken away at any moment.

There was one thing that you said that rings with truth: Our secret plan is to talk you to death. If the authorities won’t let us smoke pot in peace, we might as well harangue. Maybe then the police will leave us alone. Like the park policeman said at the rally, “Let’s go find some real crime.”

In response to Alison Green (The Mail, 4/14), I thought we were working toward the same goal. Instead of attacking the people you supposedly want to help, marijuana consumers, maybe you can learn something from us. Like it or not, large public demonstrations are a part of every movement advocating social change. Fact is, there’s safety in numbers and we feel more comfortable that way, not alone like you. If you had crawled out from under your rock and come to the rally, you would have noticed that nobody got arrested, little if any marijuana was smoked, three people joined FAMM (Families Against Mandatory Minimums), 13 people joined NORML (National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws), 500 people came out and showed their support for ending marijuana prohibition, and you just spit on them.

In closing, I’m sure everyone appreciates what you’re doing to end marijuana prohibition. However, I would like to remind Alison Green that the recommendations handed down by the U.S. Sentencing Commission have not yet been signed into law. You better hope you didn’t count your chickens before they hatched.

Event Coordinator, Fourth of July Hemp Coalition, Mount Pleasant