7

T U E S D A Y

With Hirohito’s postwar admission that he wasn’t divine, his imperial dynasty stepped into the 20th century. Still, Japan’s equivalent of the British royal family hasn’t slipped and fallen on its face, as one of the Windsors seems to do every month or so; though fundamentally irrelevant to the modern world, the imperial household still embodies much of Japan’s idealized view of itself. In a slide-illustrated lecture, “Japanese Royals: An Ancient Monarchy Encounters a Modern Nation,” anthropologist Keith Brown will explain how and why the emperor and his family keep their exalted status. At 6 p.m. at the National Museum of American History’s Carmichael Auditorium, 14th & Constitution Ave. NW. $12. (202) 357-3030. (MJ)