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Well, it looks like Eddie Dean finally has found a topic that suits his intellectual and moral temperament: a story about a man whose entire life is dedicated to the pursuit of pornography, the more bizarre and perverted, the better (“The Library of Sexual Congress,” 1/24).

Dean, who asks for such ad hominem criticism by writing articles that are filled with personal opinions and sarcastic interjections, has shown himself time and time again to be anti-intellectual, anti-high culture, anti-spiritual, anti-government, anti-education, anti-civic community (city or suburb), and sometimes just anti-life. In addition, he relishes his role of approaching potential subjects as a mild-mannered free-lance writer and then savaging them at his keyboard, often leaving them bewildered (as in the case of the square dance instructor [“The Great Square Dance Conspiracy,” 2/23/96]), though his technique totally backfired in the case of Robert Aubry Davis (“Around Town With Mr. Know-It-All,” 11/15/96). Dean couldn’t touch him.

Now he writes about a man who collects “tomes” of pornography, much of it violent and demented, and he does so without the slightest bit of criticism or hesitation. He could have asked that man why he has such a pornography obsession, and why he indulges in it so openly—in front of his mother (!).

He could have also asked the fellow if he really believes that the First Amendment is all about protecting pornography, as opposed to political free speech. Or are we to believe that Larry Flynt is really is trying to foster Jeffersonian democracy in the pages of Hustler? At the very least, Dean could have asked him about whether he thinks pornography is often a form of violence against young women, and if so, how can he possibly justify his hobby. Instead, Dean seems impressed by the size and scope of the collection, and one imagines that he spent hours “just browsing,” while being regaled with stories of which porno movie star this man has had sex with.

It’s bad enough that the entire back half of Washington City Paper is regularly overflowing with ads centered around sex: people seeking sex, people selling sex, people desperate for sex, people taking advantage of those desperate for sex. Whether for 1-900 chat lines, “deep Swedish massage,” or swingin’ couples on the prowl, the ads are at saturation levels. It would be nice if the actual news articles in the City Paper could stick to the important political, economic, social, and cultural issues of the Washington, D.C. metro area.

College Park, Md.

via the Internet