Pogo’s Revenge A few years back, D.C. attorney Doug Patton headed up the city’s Business Regulatory Reform Commission—a team of 19 business and government volunteers whose report served as a primer for the monumental 1997 reform bill that streamlined everything from taxicab regulations to business licensing. Soon after the report’s release, the D.C. financial control board plunked down $830,000 of public funds to hire the law firm Holland & Knight to take on the very same task. When Holland & Knight released their findings, Patton experienced deja vu; the hired guns had reached many of the same conclusions as the pro bono commissioners. According to an account in the Washington Post, Patton and his commission compadres were “real mad.” But, in true D.C. fashion, Patton has apparently decided to get over it. After eight months as Mayor Williams’ deputy mayor for economic development, Patton resigned from his post in October. Where’s he headed next? The public law unit at Holland & Knight. “They started talking to me before I became deputy mayor,” Patton says. He will reportedly focus on development issues, though revolving-door legislation prevents him from directly working with D.C. officials for a year.