I want to express my appreciation for the article “Resurrection” (6/30). Although the author, Robin Bingham, mentions the fact that journalists typically “commodify misery,” I gained the opposite impression from the piece. Bingham humanizes Marvin Minter in a way few people did while he was living. Rather than a typical “See! The Homeless Are People, Too!”-type article, Bingham wrote an article that allows Minter to come across as an individual who had problems but chose a lifestyle of freedom. He adapted well to his circumstances and was quite resourceful. Seeing him through his family’s eyes let us see that he was a complex, interesting person who was well-loved and had numerous positive qualities that surpassed the lifestyle he chose to lead.

It was touching to learn of someone who otherwise would have been forgotten—and unfortunate that such a free spirit could not have successfully received treatment for his mental illness and alcohol addiction. I gather from the fact that Bingham is still an intern that she is just beginning her writing career. I hope she keeps her sense of humanity and continues to report in such a personal manner. Her candid writing about her feelings in discovering Minter allow the reader to share in that unsettling experience.

However, I was curious why none of Bingham’s own photographs were included in the story—not necessarily of Minter, but others taken on that day, since they are mentioned in the story.

Bethesda, Md.