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Robert Hyman figured someone should do something about the nuisance properties in his neighborhood. So the vice president of the Glover Park Citizens Association launched an investigation—and discovered that someone had: Since as far back as 1988, the Department of Public Works (DPW) has been fining owners of derelict properties under the Clean City program. It’s just that the Department of Motor Vehicles, which is responsible for billing deadbeats, has had no way of forcing property owners to pay up. Prompted by Hyman, DPW officials have identified $7.9 million in uncollected penalties—a situation for which “a fix” is in the works, says department spokesperson Mary Myers. Hyman says it can’t come soon enough. “The city is cutting this and cutting that,” he says. “It should collect the money we’re already owed.” #151;Annys Shin