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It’s hard to keep track of the roughly 30,000 street signs in D.C. Before a March 26, 2003, collapse, the one-block alleyway that runs between M and Prospect Streets NW was known as Bank Street. Recently, it reopened, complete with brand-new street signs, one deeming it Banks Alley, another Banks Place. Which one is it? According to District Department of Transportation spokesperson Bill Rice, none of the above. “It’s Bank Alley,” says Rice, who checked the name against a master map that lists official street names approved by the D.C. Council. Frank Pacifico, acting program manager for field operations at the Traffic Services Administration, says that he remembers only two street-sign errors in his three years—one making Constitution Avenue into Constituition Avenue and a pedestrian sign that addressed “pedestrains.” Still, “in a case where you have a very small community in a historic district,” he says, “[a mistake in a street sign] could easily be overlooked.” —Mike Kanin