To March 30

Technically speaking, you could see every flick in the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center’s “The World of Terrence Malick” film series in one weekend marathon of screenings. After all, with only four directorial credits to show for a 30-plus-year-long career—punctuated by a self-imposed, 20-year-long cinematic exile—Malick doesn’t exactly have the repertoire of films to warrant a lengthy retrospective. But take my advice: Don’t do it. What, you think you can handle the one-two combination of Badlands (at 3 p.m. Saturday, March 18), Malick’s 1973 directorial debut based on the ’50s Starkweather-Fugate murders, and The New World (at 7:30 Saturday, March 18), his 2005 take on the legend of Pocahontas? Listen up, smart guy: If the filmmaker himself separated these films by more than three decades, you’re going to need more than the 20 minutes or so it’s going to take you to hit the bathroom, buy a tub of popcorn, and trot back into the theater. Hell, after catching the early screening of The Thin Red Line (pictured; shows at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, March 19), Malick’s 1998 adaptation of James Jones’ semiautobiographical novel about the conflict at Guadalcanal during WWII, you’re going to need at least the rest of the day just to re-count all the cameos in the film. What’s most important, however, is that you save a little bit of deep thinking for the sole screening of Malick’s cleanup hitter, Days of Heaven (at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 19). Featuring Nestor Almendros’ Academy Award–winning cinematography—which used only natural light and was shot mostly during the hour before sunset—the film stars Richard Gere as a Chicago steelworker who, with his girlfriend and little sister in tow, hightails it to Texas after accidentally killing his boss. If Malick’s career has taught us anything, it’s that sometimes it’s best to take your time. So make sure to pace yourself when the series opens Saturday, March 18, and runs through Thursday, March 30 (see Showtimes for weekly schedule), at the American Film Institute’s Silver Theatre and Cultural Center, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. $9.25. (301) 495-6720. (Matthew Borlik)