Julia Fullerton-Batten doesn’t want to grow up. “In Between” is the London photographer’s third exhibition dedicated to teenage girls, and each installment has grown more frenzied and rebellious. Now that she has found her footing, her angsty subjects have only become less grounded. Fullerton-Batten began her studies with images of uniformed schoolgirls in stylized classroom settings. Then, in “Teenage Stories,” she placed girls in miniature settings, conveying the larger-than-life feeling that results from living in high school’s social microcosm. For “In Between,” Fullerton-Batten’s teens have abandoned the serenity of the stationary figures. The subjects are the same, but this time, they’re all caught midair, leaping from a bed, stair, or cupboard. At times, those leaps appear death-defying, as in “Cupboards,” where a girl plummets towards a hardwood floor for a belly flop, but what 15-year-old doesn’t think she’s invincible? The frenzied motion reflects ambition and frustration—the girls are jumping towards something higher, but also toward escape. Each grand setting contains a slight imperfection—spilled milk, a broken violin, a fallen mirror—evoking what an insecure teen girl thinks of herself. That is, until she grows up and recognizes the imperfections as being part of the whole, beautiful picture, as Fullerton-Batten intended.

THE EXHIBITION IS ON VIEW FROM 11 A.M. TO 6 P.M., WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, TO OCT. 18 AT RANDALL SCOTT GALLERY, 1326 14TH ST NW. FREE. (202) 332-0806.