The prisoner was slumped over, his hands on his child’s face. His own face, seen from behind razor wire, was obscured with a black hood. When artist Julia Mandle saw this photo, taken in Guantanamo toward the beginning of the invasion of Iraq, it filled her with sadness and dread. Mandle has installed “Fabrication of Blindness/Fabricating Rain,” a dark cloud of black prison hoods that spills from the ceiling to the floor of Transformer. On each hood is a number that belongs to a real detainee, and in a corresponding envelope, Mandle keeps his story. Prisoners at Guantanamo wrote poetry about their captivity, and their lawyers preserved the work. Now Mandle is embroidering the prisoners’ words on each hood, and she invites you to join her. It’s not your average embroidery circle—from 2 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays and Saturdays, volunteers can choose a phrase from any of the heart-wrenching poems and stitch it onto the hood.

THE EXHIBITION IS ON VIEW FROM 1 P.M. TO 7 P.M. WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, , AT TRANSFORMER, 1404 P ST. NW. FREE. (202) 483-1102.