In an era of pizzazz and high-tech wizardry, Pilar Vergara’s photography is reassuringly old-school; in fact, one of Vergara’s images from Chile, her native country, could even pass for a documentary photograph of a family arriving at Ellis Island. In her other work at the Embassy of Chile, Vergara (an occasional contributor to Washington City Paper) offers a selection of her down-to-earth, sometimes gritty images of city dwellers, printed in cold-toned, inky hues. Thematically, it’s best not to read too much into the roping together of her work from Chile, Cuba and the neighborhoods of D.C., but when she’s on, Vergara offers enigmatic snapshots of everyday humanity: a teenager sitting sideways on a basketball that rests on a court of peeling white paint; a high schooler dancing solo in an unnaturally vertiginous hallway; and a young girl in a fuzzy-animal suit sitting on the lawn as a black dog darts behind her, heading smoothly out of the frame.

THE SHOW IS ON DISPLAY 10 A.M.–5 P.M., MONDAY TO FRIDAY, TO JUNE 19 AT THE EMBASSY OF CHILE, 1732 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. NW. FREE. (202) 785–1746.