Remember when suburban neighbors grew old together and their kids and grandkids grew up together? When a prodigal child could come home after years in the big city and find the cul de sac practically unchanged? Me neither, and according to Peter T. Kilborn, I never will.In Next Stop, Reloville: Life Inside America’s New Rootless Professional Class, Kilborn predicts that more and more Americans will adopt the migration patterns of an upper-middle subclass whose members—dubbed “Relos”—relocate for their jobs at a moment’s notice and never live in any single McMansion for more than a few years. Tonight, Kilborn will have to square his own research with that of the New York Times, where he did his first relo investigation in 2005, and which reported in April of this year that the “number of people who changed residences declined to 35.2 million from March 2007 to March 2008, the lowest number since 1962, when the nation had 120 million fewer people.”

KILBORN READS AT 7 P.M. AT POLITICS AND PROSE, 5015 CONNECTICUT AVE. NW. FREE. (202) 364-1919.

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