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Bring a digital camera when you hear Jan Troell speak—and expect a grimace in return. The 78-year-old Swedish auteur—known for his quiet, carefully etched period pieces—began his love affair with the captured image as a boy, when a photographer in his hometown of Malmö introduced him to the art. He used to develop images in the closet of his family’s home; there’s an endangered magic, Troell told me in an interview last year, in seeing an image form slowly, not all at once. Not that that’s a helpful attitude for a modern major filmmaker: Troell achieved the grainy, sepia-toned aesthetic of his latest film, Everlasting Moments, which follows the tempestuous life of the photographer Maria Larsson, by shooting it with 16-millimeter film and expanding it digitally to 35.

TROELL DISCUSSES AND SCREENS EVERLASTING MOMENTS AND THE SHORT PAUSE IN THE MARSHLAND AT 4:30 P.M. IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY EAST BUILDING AUDITORIUM, 4TH STreet AND CONSTITUTION AVEnue NW. FREE. (202) 737-4215.