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If painter Brice Marden liked fast cars, he would like Charles Cohan. For Cohan’s “Circuits,” his latest show at Curator’s Office, the artist layers the tracks from worldwide racing championships atop one another to create a tangled knot—a tighter, sportier, and more conceptual echo of Marden’s famous looping abstract paintings. Cohen is interested in the patterns humans leave in the land: For his last D.C. show, “Terminals,” he individually reproduced the layout of the world’s largest airports, and spread them across the gallery walls for the purpose of comparison. But “Circuits” is the antithesis of comparison—pressed together, the Formula One and MotoGP tracks are indistinguishable from each other. And also unlike the just-the-facts “Terminals,” the repetition of “Circuits” amplifies the meaning of each layer, until the end result is the illusion of a vehicular deathtrap—a course so complicated and dangerous, daredevils the world over would line up to give it a spin.

THE EXHIBITION IS ON VIEW NOON TO 6 P.M. WEDNESDAY TO SATURDAY TO MAY 1 AT CURATOR’S OFFICE, 1515 14TH ST. NW. FREE. (202) 387-1008.