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Thirty years ago, Andy Warhol produced a series of silkscreen prints called “Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century.” Warhol chose his subjects, which include Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, and Albert Einstein, on the recommendation of New York and Israeli art dealers, and dubbed the collection “Jewish Geniuses.” Critics panned Warhol, who had until this point displayed little interest in Jewish culture, deeming his work exploitive and commercially motivated. In “Warhol’s Jews: Ten Portraits Reconsidered,” audiences can again view this suite of 40-by-32-inch prints. For those who know Warhol mainly through his prints of Marilyn Monroe and Campbell’s Soup cans, these portraits may be surprising. There’s none of his signature repetition, and the colors are fairly subdued. What’s most interesting to see, though, is that the cultural relevance of Warhol’s subjects, and the debates surrounding them, have largely endured.

THE EXHIBITION IS ON VIEW 10 A.M. TO 10 P.M. SUNDAY TO THURSDAY AND 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. FRIDAY TO MAY 2 AT THE WASHINGTON D.C. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER’S ANN LOEB BRONFMAN GALLERY, 1529 16TH ST. NW. (202) 518-9400. FREE.