The coastal barrier islands of South Carolina are not just the home to luxurious beach resorts and all-you-can-eat oyster bars. Long before a thirst for Southern charm served as the perfect cue for a weekend getaway, the rich cultural heritage of the Gullah people persevered for generations as a relatively autonomous community bound together by a common language. Scholar Alphonso Brown speaks on “The Gullah Legacy” in conjunction with the exhibition “Word, Shout, Song,” which highlights pioneering linguist Lorenzo Dow Turner’s work in preserving this distinctive language for posterity. Your appreciation for Gullah’s continued survival will only deepen as Brown—who’s fluent in the language—relates Gullah stories from the past and shares a few lines of his mother tongue. Brown has won praise from The New York Times and the late Charles Kuralt alike for the Gullah tours he leads in his native Charleston—New Orleans doesn’t have a monopoly on Creole.

ALPHONSO BROWN SPEAKS AT 7 P.M. AT THE ANACOSTIA COMMUNITY MUSEUM, 1901 FORT PL. SE. FREE. (202) 633-4820.