Credit: Illustration by Brooke Hatfield

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You don’t need a good reason to love a pop song, just a personal one. And while there are plenty of good reasons to love The Dismemberment Plan’s classic 1999 album Emergency & I—its wit, its omnivorousness, its simplicity, its chutzpah—fans tend to default on more individual explanations. Paul Thompson, in a recent Pitchfork review of the Emergency & I reissue, wrote that the album helped him through a breakup in his teens, and more serious losses a few years later. In last week’s Washington City Paper, Aaron Leitko tracked down a musician who regrets the drunk driving that led to his three-year jail sentence, but feels fine about the D-Plan tattoo on his ribcage. I saw The Dismemberment Plan with a girlfriend once, but I don’t remember Emergency & I offering much comfort when we split a few months later. Later, I listened to the band’s 2001 follow-up, Change, during a period of some soul-searching, but I can’t say what wisdom it offered. So here’s my D-Plan story. I’ve seen the band at least half a dozen times, and while the 2007 reunion show I attended wasn’t the best one, it sticks out for a reason any D-Plan lover will appreciate: I finally made it on stage during “The Ice of Boston.”

THE DISMEMBERMENT PLAN PERFORMS WITH POOR BUT SEXY AND BATALA AT 7 P.M. AT THE 9:30 CLUB, 815 V ST. NW. $20; SOLD OUT. (202) 265-0930.