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Belarus has had the same dictator since 1994, and a small theater collective has had enough of him. They call themselves the Belarus Free Theater, and their angry agitprop uses blunt metaphor to highlight the cruel absence of liberty under an authoritarian regime. Director Madeleine Sackler frames Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus around the 2010 election, where there’s widespread protest and electoral fraud, following the company members as they perform in secret. The performers live in exile in the year following the election, but they don’t hide as their performances earn accolades in America and theater festivals. Dangerous Acts starts with promise—Sackler shrewdly cuts between the company’s performance and police brutality—only to follow the tropes of so many issue-based docs, complete with a call to action just before the credits roll. Belarus Free Theater’s work is courageous, moving, and experimental. It’s a pity that this documentary didn’t learn much from its efforts.