A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

Good morning, newsletter readers. Because  Independence Day falls on a Tuesday this year, we’re taking a long weekend. District Line Daily will be back next Wednesday.

 Georgetown’s vegetarian taco restaurant Chaia is one of many local fast-casual restaurants  grappling with a tough decision as an already swollen market becomes even more saturated with competition. Should it go cashless to streamline operations and reduce customer wait times? Or should it continue to accept cash in order to make its healthy food more accessible to all Washingtonians?

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Senator Al Franken talks ending homelessness with Street Sense vendor Ken Martin. [Street Sense]

  • Heat and humidity will last for days. Happy 4th! [Post, ABC7]

  • Petula on a Chipotle burrito-line worker, 18, who is a multi-lingual opera prodigy. [Post]

  • Fairfax County school brings lunches outside for the summer. [Post]

  • Bethesda and Medical Center Metro stations closed four weekends this summer. [GGW]

  • Officials plan tight security for July 4 celebration on National Mall. [NBC4, ABC7]

  • CSX victims in tragic Amtrak accident identified, just 20 and 25 years old. [WTOP]

  • The D.C. national parks you may not know about. [WTOP]

  • A new, free makerspace opens in Ward 8. [WBJ]

  • Trea Turner has a broken wrist and no planned return date to the Nats. [Fox5]

  • Police search for 14-year-old boy missing from Northwest. [ABC7]

  • And a 16-year-old girl from Southeast. [WUSA9]

 RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY: 

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Jeffrey Anderson (tips? jeff.anderson@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • American City Diner owner and former mayoral candidate Jeffrey Gildenhorn dies after choking. [NBC4, Post]

  • Political bulldog Chuck Thies on the Cheh report and the Bowser regime. [Current]

  • Bowser mixes with older voters at Senior Fest. [Times]

  • Accidents will happen: DDOT maps dangerous intersections. [WUSA9]

  • Justice Department cries “uncle” on Washington football team’s name. [ABC7, Post]

  • CM Charles Allen, others fight for public campaign financing. [WAMU, Post]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Historical Society and the library’sWashingtoniana collection will move temporarily to the Newseum. [Post]

  • Ten years running, Girls Rock! D.C. has taught music and feminist empowerment to D.C. youth. [Kojo Nnamdi Show]

  • Kris Funn’s debut album is visceral, cerebral, and, well, fun. [WCP]

  • The HERA Festival, D.C.’s first all-female-fronted music festival, begins this weekend. [DC Music Download]

  • Artists started becoming activists well before the election of Donald Trump. [Post]

 YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Critic Tim Carman’s 10 best barbecue restaurants, with a surprise No. 1. [Post]

  • This 22-year-old turned his 142,000 Instagram followers into a career in food. [Washingtonian]

  • What local restaurants are cooking up for the July 4 weekend. [Times]

  • Where to dine in Rehoboth if you’re beach bound. [Zagat]

  • Scott Patterson from the show Gilmore Girls is launching his own coffee brand. [Yahoo]

  • An explainer on how the martini glass was replaced with the coupe. [Gothamist]

 HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Andrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Local media outlets cover homelessness—from shelters to streets. [DC Homeless Crisis]

  • City Paper looks at homeless chefs, pending shelter policy, and a homeless hotel. [WCP]

  • More on how the city is maneuvering to reduce chronic individual homelessness. [DCist]

  • And a bit about the shortcomings of the District’s “rapid rehousing” program. [Economist]

  • Historic preservation officials OK designs for Apple store at Carnegie Library. [UrbanTurf]

  • Council prepares to vote on bill that would require inspections of Airbnb listings. [NBC4]

  • Law firms are trending towards relocating into the top floors of office buildings. [Bisnow]

  • Developer that manages buildings near Nats Park posts quirky baseball signage. [Post]

  • D.C. reaches a turning point for Southeast’s Barry Farm public housing complex. [Times]

  • What we talk about when we talk about the G-word in the District—gentrification. [GGW]

  • Six-bedroom, five-bathroom home near National Cathedral going for $6.5 million. [WBJ]

  • D.C.’s most “amenity-packed buildings,” mapped. [Curbed DC]

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