A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

Judges, defendants, service providers, and government officials came together on Friday to celebrate the work the Mental Health Community Court has done over the past 10 years and advocate for more resources. The program, which started a decade ago as a collaboration between the D.C. Superior Court, the D.C. Pretrial Service Agency, the United States Attorney’s Office, the Criminal Justice Act Bar, the Public Defender Service, and the D.C. Department of Behavioral Health, has served more than 3,500 individuals. One particularly poignant insight came from Susan Carroll, who has schizophrenia and received treatment through the program. “They helped me believe I belong in society with everyone else,” she said.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • D.C. Jail held a man for more than two months after his case was dismissed. [Post]

  • Should Metro ban bad passengers? Officials are considering it. [WTOP]

  • Gates Foundation donates $10 million to D.C. College Access Program. [Post]

  • Two planes collide on National Airport runway but escape with minimal damage. [Fox5]

  • Millennials, who once flocked to D.C., are leaving the region. [Post]

  • Meet the most powerful women in Washington. [Washingtonian]

  • Hundreds join 5K at Banneker Rec Center to raise money for Puerto Rico. [WUSA9]

  • Regional leaders take a knee outside D.C. Superior Court. [WUSA9]

  • ’Skins cornerbackJosh Norman donates $100,000 to Puerto Rico relief efforts. [WJLA]

  • Man stabbed on Blue Line train last night won’t cooperate with officials. [WTOP]

RECENT CITY PAPER STORIES TO HELP YOU MAKE SENSE OF YOUR DAY:

LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Jeffrey Anderson (tips? jeff.anderson@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Jeanette Mobleywants to revive Ward 5 Dems. [Afro]

  • ACLU is fighting search warrants targeting Inauguration Day protesters. [FOX5]

  • Opinion: Mendelson’s moratorium on anti-business bills doesn’t go far enough. [Blade]

  • Here’s how Metrobus could improve. [D.C. Policy Center]

  • D.C. Department of Health sex-ed campaign teaches and empowers youth. [Times]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • The North Country’s Andrew Grossmandiscusses the inspirations behind the band’s new album. [DC Music Download]

  • Multiflora Productions launches its first Multiflora Music Festival, a month-long tribute to global sounds. [DCist]

  • Majority Rule and pageninetynineraise more than $36,000 for charities during their reunion tour. [WCP]

  • Dave Chappelle receives a key to the city from Mayor Muriel Bowser. [DCist]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, by Laura Hayes(tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Church and Stateon H Street NE honors fallen musicians with themed cocktails. [WCP]

  • A weekend-only Japanese comfort food stall opens in Union Market. [WCP]

  • Someone needed to step up: José Andrés becomes face of disaster relief. [Post]

  • Town Tavern pays tribute to Harry Potter this month. [Washingtonian]

  • Where to find breakfast tacos. [Eater]

  • The Matchbox lawsuit continues to heat up. Drew Kim now has to pay $168,000. [WBJ]

  • Meet one of D.C.’s top drag queens, seen frequently atPerry’s. [DC Refined]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Andrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper)

  • Local developer sells 3-acre site in Capitol Riverfront. [WBJ]

  • District’s housing market is slowing down this year, given lack of usual fall pick-up. [Post]

  • New Mount Pleasant residential building will feature “robotic furniture.” [UrbanTurf]

  • How a District program helps developers go green and save money over time. [GGW]

  • Twenty-eight Truxton Circle rowhouses get historic designation. [Curbed DC]

  • Peek inside the apartments at the new Hine School development. [Curbed DC]

  • D.C. area commercial office developers encounter occupancy challenges. [Bisnow]

  • Realtor op-ed: D.C.’s Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act has harmed landlords. [Blade]

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