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A morning roundup of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District. Send tips and ideas to citydesk@washingtoncitypaper.com.

Sex workers frequently experience abuse at the hands of police officers, especially in D.C., where assault cases are well-documented. Though the D.C. Council has treated street prostitution as an eyesore in the past, at-large Councilmember David Grosso is currently working to remove criminal penalties related to the buying and selling of sex.The Reducing Criminalization to Promote Public Safety and Health Amendment Act of 2017 would also set up a task force that would study the bill’s impact on sex workers.

LEADING THE MORNING NEWS:

  • Yep, that was an earthquake you felt yesterday afternoon. [WJLA]

  • At current rate, D.C. could pay off its Nationals Park debt by 2026. [WBJ]

  • Police seek suspect who stabbed an individual multiple times on Wednesday. [WUSA9]

  • More D.C. residents join lawsuit against District over food stamp problems. [WAMU]

  • Trial continues for security guards charged with involuntary manslaughter in 2015 death of Washington Hospital Center patient. [Post]

  • GSA will likely get a 60-day extension to reveal plan for new FBI HQ. [WBJ]

  • Bundle up: Colder temperatures (and maybe some snow) arrive next week. [FOX5]

  • Progressive Dupont church installs “faith palm” signs that criticize the conservative agenda of lawmakers. [WUSA9]

  • Moorish Nationalist couple arrested again for trying to claim “ancestral rights” to vacant Adams Morgan rowhouse. [NBC4]

  • Kojoconsiders how Capital One Arena (f.k.a. Verizon Center) changed D.C. [WAMU]

  • Washington football team loses to Dallas in an embarrassing fashion. [FOX5]

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LOOSE LIPS LINKS, by Jeffrey Anderson (tips? jeff.anderson@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Board of Education member calls for system-wide data management investigation in the wake of Ballou graduation rate scandal. [WJLA]

  • Internal review shows 98 percent of D.C. Public Schools grads needed remedial courses once they enrolled at UDC. [WJLA]

  • D.C. redoubles efforts to improve adult education programs. [Afro]

  • Teacher sex abuse revelations lead to ouster of officials and administrators at Latin American Montessori Bilingual Public Charter School. [Post]

  • City officials take on D.C.’s rat problem using data. [WAMU]

  • D.C. Council considers solutions as cemeteries struggle to pay massive D.C. Water bills. [Post]

ARTS LINKS, by Matt Cohen (tips? mcohen@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Only Lonesome are making a splash in D.C.’s music scene with their urban, old-school bluegrass sound. [Post]

  • Listen to a new Christmas tune from The North Country, “Don’t Shop Just Love.” [BYT]

  • A new pop-up museum at Potter’s House looks back at a year of protests in D.C. [Washingtonian]

  • At the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Magnetic Fields highlights the black women often excluded from the abstract art canon. [WCP]

YOUNG & HUNGRY LINKS, byLaura Hayes (tips? lhayes@washingtoncitypaper.com)

  • Casual Indian restaurant RASA opens Wednesday in Navy Yard. [WCP]

  • Dublin’s best drunk snack—fried food in a bag—is now available in D.C. [WCP]

  • Which Shaw holiday pop-up bar is better? [Post]

  • Look inside the newly renovated Jackie Lee’s, now with Nintendo. [Eater]

  • Chips and Guapo’s: Tex-Mex chain will replace Orange Anchor in Georgetown. [WBJ]

  • Don’t drink regular hot chocolate when these fancy options are available. [DC Refined]

HOUSING COMPLEX LINKS, by Andrew Giambrone (tips? agiambrone@washingtoncitypaper)

  • Redevelopment of former Temple Courts site focuses on affordability. [WCP]

  • Neighbors wonder: What’s going on with the Sursum Corda redevelopment? [Popville]

  • These five local redevelopment projects link universities and developers. [Bisnow]

  • Thirty percent of the units at new Shaw development The Wren will be set aside as affordable. [UrbanTurf]

  • The former Hebrew Home on Spring Road NW will become lots of affordable units. Can it be a model? [GGW]

  • A seller’s market: One in five D.C. homes sold this year were all-cash deals. [UrbanTurf]

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